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Office of Professional Studies

Summer Course Descriptions


Summer 1 (May 19th- June 27th)


ACC 3303
Intermediate Accounting I 4 cr.

The Intermediate Accounting course sequence constitutes the “keystone” of the accounting curriculum for accounting concentrates. The central theme of the Intermediate Accounting course sequence is financial accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by which it is governed. The objective of the course sequence is to allow the students to develop a sophisticated comprehension of GAAP, the related theory underlying these GAAP and the corresponding practices, procedures and techniques employed in their application. Intermediate Accounting I concentrates on their application to economic resources (assets). Prerequisite: BUS 2203. 

BIO 1027
Principles of Biology I 4 cr.

The Unity and Diversity of Life: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms. An introduction to biological principles at the cellular and molecular level. Central topics include cell structure and function, energy transduction, the flow of genetic information, cellular reproduction, and intracellular and intercellular communication. Laboratory investigations supplement the lecture material and introduce students to the theory and practice of the scientific method and the application of basic techniques in cell and molecular biology. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

BIO 3009
Environment, Ecology and Society 4 cr.

The course engages students to inquire the linkages between ecological systems, human systems and human perturbations of natural ecological systems. Emphasis is placed on applied environmental issues that currently confront the planet. Students will also discuss the process of biological/ecological inquiry and the nature of science. This course will acquaint students with some of the social, economic, political, and ethical aspects of environmental problems following an introduction to the basic principles of ecology - the study of the interactions among organisms and their physical environment. The future of our society depends on whether Homo sapiens can learn to live in harmony with the global ecosystem so that it can support civilization. Knowing how the world ecosystem works permits more than knowledgeable participation in the great decisions of our day. Consideration will be given to alternative ways of organizing our society in accordance with sound ecological principles. Students will read several topical papers and conduct a semester-long investigation on an approved topic. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core (pending approval). 

BIO 3064
Marine Biology 4 cr.

A study of life and processes in the marine environment. The course stresses an ecological approach to the study of marine organisms, their adaptations, habitats, physiology and behavior, with emphasis on the importance of marine ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems and to humankind. Special emphasis will be placed on biodiversity and conservation of ocean ecosystems as well as human impacts on the sea (fisheries, pollution, eutrophication, global climate change, environmental impacts of industrial activities and human populations, among other topics). Laboratories will include comparative anatomy and physiology of marine animals, site visits and field work. Prerequisites: BIO 1027, BIO 1028, BIO 2010, CHEM 111, CHEM 112. 

BUS 1100
Essentials of Business Analysis & Decision Making 4 cr.

Primarily for freshmen, the course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the functional areas of business while emphasizing oral and written communication and effective group interaction. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of business through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technological applications and outside activities. Open only to business majors, business minors, students who have this course as a requirement in their major (e.g., Environmental Studies & Sustainability majors), or permission of Dean.  

BUS 2210
Management Information Systems 4 cr.

Management Information Systems presents a core of IS principles with which every business student should be familiar. Information technology has become a key component in accomplishing strategic and operational goals in organizations today. It is necessary to understand how a company utilizes information technology to gain its competitive advantage in business. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental concepts and principles of information systems. Therefore, it focuses on breadth of coverage rather than the depth of any specific IS area. Topics include: the role of IT in organizations, computers and information processing, hardware and software, managing data resources, telecommunications and networks, electronic commerce, security, IS ethics and leading information technologies and applications. Prerequisites: BUS 1100.

BUS 2213
Business Statistics 4 cr.

Provides an introduction to fundamental statistical principles and procedures. Topics include descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions and sampling distributions, statistical inference and estimation, linear regression and correlation. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, MTH 1003 or MTH 1115 (must take either course), BUS 0091, BUS 0092, BUS 0093. MTH1111 cannot be taken to satisfy this requirement. Fulfills Q in LS Core. 

BUS 3302
Advanced Business Analysis & Decision Making 4 cr.

The primary focus of the course is to provide students with the proper tools to excel at analyzing business issues in a creative and innovative fashion. It requires a broad based knowledge of the various functional areas of business and how they are inter-related. Students are expected to develop improved decision-making skills based upon operational analysis and will work in teams to develop a business plan for a new or existing business. The course serves as a foundation for the senior capstone course in Strategic Analysis and Decision Making. Prerequisites: BUS 2205, BUS 2210, BUS 2215, BUS 2220. Fulfills X in LS Core. 

CEN 4060 Geology 4 cr.

An introduction to physical and historical geology including mineral and rock identification, earthquakes, plate tectonics and natural earth resources. Emphasis is placed on map interpretation of land forms, sedimentation, earthquake mechanisms, engineering geology and applied geology. Occasional laboratory sessions and field trips will be arranged. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills X in LS Core. 

CHM 1110
General Chemistry I 4 cr.

Science and engineering students will take this course. Topics include the composition of matter, the mole, stoichiometry, atomic structure, molecular bonding and structure, and the solid and liquid states. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: one year of High School Chemistry and MTH 1000 or placing out of MTH 1000 on the math placement test. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Offered every fall semester.  

CHM 2210
Organic Chemistry I 4 cr.

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon. The concepts of bonding, structure, and classification of compounds by functional groups, as well as reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers are presented from a mechanistic viewpoint. Stereochemical principles are emphasized. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are introduced. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: CHM 1120. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Offered every semester. 

COM 2301
Introduction to Organizational Communication 4 cr.

This course focuses on how organizations serve as an entity for members of a society to achieve their collective goals—from making laws and building bridges to the local and international trade of goods and services. Organizational communication is the study of how persons accomplish these goals via the ongoing, mutual exchange of verbal and nonverbal messages. This course provides students with a firm grounding in organizational communication theory, while at the same time highlighting the very practical nature of this endeavor by 1) applying various theoretical perspectives to organizational settings and situations; 2) identifying communication problems in a variety of organizational contexts; and 3) utilizing current scholarly research and theory to further our understanding of organizational phenomena. No prerequisite. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

CRM1000C Introduction to Criminology 4 cr.

This course explores crime, justice, and punishment. In this course, the causes of crime and the solutions and policies in place to deter or solve crime will be critically examined. We will also examine the social processes whereby crime is defined and detected, and offenders are apprehended and punished. The overall objective of the course is to examine crime and punishment within the context of the society and culture which surrounds it. These topics are connected to inequalities of race, class, and gender, which will be key concerns throughout this course. Coverage of crime and punishment in the popular media is also a central focus of this course. 

CRM 2200 Corporate and White Collar Crime 4 cr.

The purpose of this course is to examine various topics and issues related to criminal, deviant and other harmful behaviors committed for economic advantage by both individuals and organizations in the business sector. How do we define corporate and white collar crime? How prevalent is white collar crime? What are the sources and motivations of corporate and white collar criminal behavior? What are the social and economic costs to local and national communities? How effective are the sanctions utilized to deter and control individual and corporate crimes? Prerequisite: CRM 1000 or consent of the instructor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

 
ECO 1201
An Introduction to Economics 4 cr.

This course is an introduction to how people in society confront the economic problem; i.e., how societies provision themselves. Stress is given to how markets work. Topics include supply and demand analysis, consumer choice theory, cost functions, market structures and aggregate economic relationships. Prerequisite: MTH 1000 or placing out of MTH 1000 on Math placement test. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

HIS 1106
History of American Civilization, 1607-1877 4 cr.

This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H in LS Core. 

ENG 3900
Creative Writing: Fiction 4 cr.

This course is designed for students interested in working with fiction writing, either short stories or longer pieces of fiction. The first half of the course involves analyzing selected short stories and working with focused creative writing exercises. The second half of the course is set up as a fiction workshop, with students reading their fiction in small groups and before the class as a whole to receive comments and reactions. Prerequisite: ENG/WRT 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. 


FAA 1210
Basic Drawing I 4 cr.

An approach to drawing and its values through studio experience. Seeing is emphasized through a series of exercises involving figure and still-life drawing primarily concentrating on line. Light and dark values are investigated later in the course. Abstraction is briefly considered. Prerequisite: None. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS core. 

FAA 1270
Basic Painting I 4 cr.

An introduction to the principles of painting through direct studio experience with an emphasis on the plastic nature of painting and basic pictorial values. Attention to the needs of individual students. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. 

FYW 1050
Introduction to College Writing 4 cr.

This course examines the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the interaction of writer, audience, language, purpose, and situation. Fosters an understanding of the ways in which writing, thinking, and learning are related. Sections limited to 15 students each. Intensive concentration during the semester on the student’s own writing examined in class and in conference with the instructor. Either WRT1050 or ENG 1050 satisfies the Institutional requirement in first year writing. Fulfills FYW in LS Core. Cannot be taken in addition to ENG 1050. 

HSC1104
Introduction to Human Disease 4 cr.

The course will offer an introduction to human disease appropriate for students of all majors. The human body is a masterpiece of art. The more one understands the functioning of the body, the greater appreciation one has for it. Disease states, the body’s natural attempts to right what is wrong and the compensatory actions involved will be discussed. The general mechanisms of disease as well as specific body systems will be discussed from a human-interest point of view. The course focuses on basic medical concepts that are useful to every student and encourages them to become a medical advocate for themselves or for family members. It is so important to understand doctors and your health care plan, to be able to ask important questions, and to know what questions to ask. In addition, the course will cover many diseases that are ‘in the news’ and allow the student to gain some knowledge and insight into the myths and facts surrounding these diseases. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

HSC 1122
Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr.

An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. This course will focus on the basic principles of cells and tissues, and the integumentary, musculoskeletal, central and peripheral nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide the opportunity for the student to understand, acquire and develop the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

 
HSC 2300
Nutrition, Diet and Health 4 cr.

Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

HSC3400
Clinical Research Design 4 cr.

The course emphasizes research methods used for the conduct of human studies and will introduce students to the ethical conduct of clinical research. The research methodologies of 4 study designs will be explored, focusing on the applicability of each design to differing research questions and the benefits of each design. The course will cover the development of a good research question, study design, selection of study subjects, data collection and management, analysis and how to estimate study sample size. Students will address a current public health problem and develop a research protocol that addresses the public health problem. Prerequisites: HSC3302 or by permission. 

MGT 3308
Quality Management 4 cr.

This course provides an overview of the importance of quality in a rapidly changing business environment. Quality management principles, methods and tools will be introduced and requirements for successful implementation of a quality management program will be identified. Prerequisite: BUS 2220. 

PHL 1000
Introduction to Philosophy 4 cr.

A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor. Fulfills PHL in LS Core. 

PHL 2100 (W)
Women, Ethics & Society 4 cr.

What is feminism? What are the different forms of oppression? This topic-driven course explores the moral dilemmas that result from living in a patriarchal society. Students will read leading feminist scholarship on topics related to sexism, such as body image, sexuality and violence, and media representations of oppressed groups. Students will have the opportunity to determine where they stand on controversial issues by participating in class discussions. Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills E, D and W in LS Core. 

PHL 2020(W)
Perspectives on the Good Life 4 cr.

Before it comes to an end, how shall I spend the life I have? What would make that life genuinely worth living? We will seek the guidance of many masters: East and West, ancient and modern, women and men and from diverse races. We have much to consider, but the main challenge for each of us is to shape a perspective we can each embrace as our own. What could be more important? Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfill E and W in LS Core. 

PHY2201
General Physics I 4 cr.

First part of a one-year introduction, without calculus, to the elements of physics. Topics include mechanics, electricity, magnetism, optics, waves, and (time permitting) thermodynamics and modern physics. Prerequisite: MTH 1000 or equivalent. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

POL 1100
Politics of the United States 4 cr.

An introduction to the American political system, this course examines (1) the Constitutional basis of American politics, (2) the national institutions that are involved in decision-making and public debate (for example, the Presidency and the bureaucracy, the Federal Courts, the Congress, political parties, the media), (3) issues that Americans argue about (rights and liberties, economic benefits, foreign policy), and the processes by which those arguments are conducted and resolved (campaigns and elections, administrative action, legislation, lobbying, publicity). Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and X in LS Core. 

PSY 1000
Introduction to Psychology 4 cr.

Provides students with a general overview, from a scientific standpoint, of this wide-ranging field. Explores major issues and concepts in the study of human behavior including biological foundations, perception, motivation, learning, developmental processes, personality, social factor, psychological disorders and therapy. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. This course provides a general overview of the wide-ranging field of psychology. Students will explore major concepts and issues in the study of human thinking, feeling and acting. These include biological foundations of behavior and experience, how people learn and develop, how individuals perceive the world, what prompts people to act the way that they do, individual differences in behavior, social relations, the difference between normative and non-normative behavior, and approaches to therapy. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS core. 

PSY 2300
Developmental Psychology 4 cr.

Introduction to theory and research related to the development of psychological processes from infancy to adulthood. Analyzes the concept of development, the nature-nurture issue and the epigenetic nature of human development. Also examines cognitive, social, and personality development in their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: PSY 1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

RTS1100
Christianity in Context 4 cr.

As an introduction to Christianity, this course will investigate a number of the “contexts” in which it began, in which it developed, and in which we find it today. Students will study Christianity in the historical contexts within the ancient world and of ancient Judaism, in the literary contexts of the Christian Bible and its interpretation, in the intellectual context of church history, and in contemporary global contexts. In keeping with the College’s Augustinian identity, mission, and vision, this course will also highlight the contributions of St. Augustine. Satisfies the first institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. Fulfills RTS in LS Core. 

SME 1104
Introduction to Physical Activity, Fitness, and Wellness 4 cr.

This course is a survey of the discipline of health and fitness, including knowledge derived from performing physical activity, studying about physical activity, and professional practice centered in physical activity. It includes an analysis of the importance of health and wellness in daily life, the relationship between physical activity and the discipline of kinesiology, and the general effects of physical activity experiences. The course surveys the general knowledge base of the Health Science discipline as reflected in the major sub disciplines and reviews selected concepts in each, showing how they contribute to our understanding of the nature and importance of physical activity. The students will learn about the fitness components of wellness; flexibility, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, nutrition, weight management, and cancer. Fitness and other positive life style habits that lead to better health, improved quality of life, and total well-being will be discussed. Students will be responsible for developing a self-paced fitness program that will be followed for the duration of the semester. In addition, the course introduces students to the general and specific characteristics of the health and wellness professions. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core.

SOC1001
Principles of Sociology 4 cr.

The objectives of this introductory course are: (1) to cultivate the sociological perspective by acquainting students with basic sociological theories, methods, concepts and findings; (2) to use the basic concepts and principles of sociology to examine the various sectors of social life; and, (3) to develop an awareness of how and why social forces influence the experiences of everyday life. The course usually begins with a brief review of sociology’s historical origin, its major theoretical perspectives and its various research methodologies. The nature of culture, social interaction, group dynamics, bureaucracy, socialization, deviance, crime, urbanization, collective behavior, and social change are some of the topics studied. The course also explores some of the institutions of society, such as the family, the political economy, religion, education, and the medical system. A central focus of the course is understanding the nature of social inequality as it exists in the United States and across the globe in terms of age, gender, race, and social class. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

SPA 1110
Introductory Spanish I 4 cr.

This course is offered for students with little or no background in Spanish. Oral-aural Proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including mandatory language lab. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language. Fulfills FL in LS Core. 

SPM 3000
Introduction to Sport Management 4 cr.

In this course, students will be introduced to the unique opportunities and operational aspects of a sport management career. The course will provide introductory exposure to the following areas: the historical evolution of American and international sports; the relationship between the mass media and the sports industry; the economic impact of sports; the interactive relationship between sports and society; and legal and ethical issues in sport management. Prerequisite: BUS 1100.

WGS 3230
Gender and Popular Culture 4 cr.

Popular Culture is the US’s second largest export after weapons. In this course, we will examine how gender is used in popular culture artifacts from popular entertainment including sports, popular films, music and more. Employing popular culture methods and theories including cultural studies we will study how the meaning system is used to reinforce the status quo and also challenge it. By focusing on popular culture representations of women and gender in advertising, music videos, YouTube, television, magazines, and film we will explore how cultural values, fears, hopes and dreams are coded into gender scripts and representations and how race, class ethnicity, sex, and nation are interlocked with gender. We will ask what is at stake both in negotiating gender in contemporary culture and in doing “feminist” cultural criticism. In addition we will look at fan culture and ask what pop culture gender representations have to do with the lives and experiences of real people. Fulfills D in LS Core.

Summer 3 (May 19th – August 8th)

 

BUS 2203
Accounting for Business 4 cr.

A computer and project based course designed to develop the students’ ability to read and interpret internal and external financial reports, understand their underlying concepts, use their information in making informed decisions, and understand the effects of management decisions on these reports and the financial performance of the business. Topics include the basic concepts of the accounting process, preparation of the financial statements, analysis and application of the generally accepted accounting principles used to account for the various elements of the balance sheet and income statement, accounting for manufacturing operations, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costing, budgeting, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: BUS 1100.

BUS 4850
Business Internship 4 cr.

Paid and unpaid internships are an opportunity for students to gain experience in actual work settings where they can apply their classroom and other prior learning. Students work with their work setting supervisor and their professor to gain insights into the daily routines and the overall process, activities, and content of a particular setting or industry. Internships may be in for-profit, not-for-profit or public sector organizations depending on the interests of the student. While there is no specific GPA requirement for the course, it is generally recommended that you have a minimum GPA of 2.70. Permission must be obtained from the internship Professor prior to registration. Fulfills X in LS Core.

COM 4851
Summer Communication Internship 4 cr.

This course is a work-study experience co-supervised by the Communication Arts and Sciences Department and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, communication or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the communication discipline. Students must work in the field at least an average of 15 hours per week for eight weeks, totaling 120 hours. In addition, students will work individually through email with the Internship Director to produce a 10-15 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience. Prerequisite: COM 2010 and permission of instructor. Fulfills X in LS Core.

 
CSC 1610
Computer Science I 4 cr.

An introduction to computer science techniques with an emphasis on algorithm development and structured programming. Topics include program development, modularity, streams, control structures, functions, recursion and arrays. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

CSC2620
Object Oriented Programming 4 cr.

A study of object oriented design and its key concepts: data abstraction, inheritance, information hiding, polymorphism, and encapsulation. Object oriented design and analysis concepts will be introduced and implemented using UML. Programs illustrating key concepts will be written in Java. Prerequisite: CSC 1610 with a minimum passing grade of C or consent of the instructor. Four hours a week.

 
HSC 4850, 4855
Health Science Internship 4 cr.

A work-study experience co-supervised by the Internship Coordinator and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, community, or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the health care field. Students who volunteer for internship in clinical, academic, and community settings provide a public service to the facility or program. Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of the department. Fulfills X in LS Core.

MTH 1000
Concepts in Algebra 4 cr.

A one semester course designed to develop fundamental algebraic and problem-solving concepts and skills. Topics include linear, quadratic, square root, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and equations. This course utilizes individual investigation, group problem-solving, and writing in order to enhance students’ understanding of algebraic models and the problem-solving process. A graphing calculator is required. We recommend a TI-84+. This course is open only to students whose Placement Test results indicate that they need further preparation for subsequent mathematics courses. Fulfills Q in LS Core. 

MTH 1003
Introductory Mathematics for Business 4 cr.

A one-semester course designed to develop algebraic and quantitative problem-solving skills. Students will use algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as matrices and fundamental concepts of probability to solve applied problems selected primarily from the field of business. This course is not open to students who have credit for any math course numbered MTH 1115 or higher. Fulfills Q in LS Core.

MTH 1111
Basic Statistics 4 cr.

Basic methods of statistical inference including the organization and analysis of data, sampling theory, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance. MTH 1111 is not open to students with credit for MTH 2527, MTH 1505, BUS 2213, BE 213, or ST 211. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.

MTH 1217
Calculus I 4 cr.

A first course in calculus for functions of a single variable. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and applications of differentiation, including related rates, optimization, and the evaluation of indeterminate forms will be covered. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Prerequisite: MTH 1016 or exemption from MTH 1016 through the Mathematics Placement exam. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

MTH 1218
Calculus II 4 cr.

A continuation of MTH 1217 for functions of a single variable. Includes techniques and applications of integration, sequences, and series, including Taylor series, and vector algebra. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Prerequisite: MTH 1217. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

MTH 2219
Calculus III 4 cr.

Functions in parametric form and the calculus of these functions, including polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Vectors in two and three dimensional space and the calculus of vector-valued functions. Lines, planes, and surfaces in three dimensional space. The calculus of functions of several variables: limits, partial and directional derivatives, gradient, tangent planes and normal lines, relative maxima and minima, double and triple integrals in rectangular and polar form. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Computer algebra software may also be required. Prerequisite: MTH 1218. 

MTH 2220
Differential Equations 4 cr.

An introduction to ordinary differential equations and their use in science and engineering. Topics include first order separable, linear, homogeneous and exact equations; higher order linear equations and first order linear systems; elementary numerical methods; and an introduction to planar dynamical systems and their local phase portraits at critical points. An emphasis is placed on linear equations and systems and their solution using techniques such as eigenvalues, variation of parameters, Laplace transform, and power series. Prerequisite: MTH 2219 or consent of the instructor. 

POL 4851
Public Service Summer Internship 4 cr.

As participant observers, students study theoretical and practical approaches to government by serving as research and staff aides to leaders in the public sector at the federal, state or local levels of government. Students must work in the field at least an average of 15 hours per week for eight weeks, totaling 120 hours. In addition, students will work individually through email with the internship Director to produce a 10-15 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience. Prerequisite: Seniors and juniors with permission from the instructor. Fulfills X in LS Core.

SME 4850
Sports Medicine Internship 4 cr.

A work-study experience co-supervised by the Internship Coordinator and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, community, or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the health care field. Students who volunteer for internship in clinical, academic, and community settings provide a public service to the facility or program. Internship placements are available in the areas of Pre-Physical Therapy and Strength and Conditioning. These placements will include three five-week rotations at differing Physical Therapy, Sports Medicine, Strength and Conditioning facilities. Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of the department. Fulfills X in LS Core.

Summer 2 (July 7th- August 15th)


ACC 3304
Intermediate Accounting II 4 cr.

The second course in the Intermediate Accounting sequence. The central theme of the course is financial accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by which it is governed. The objective of the course is to allow students to develop a sophisticated comprehension of GAAP, its underlying theories, and corresponding practices, procedures, and techniques employed in their application. Intermediate Accounting II concentrates on student application to sources of economic resources (liabilities and equity). Prerequisite: ACC 3303. 

ACC 4406
Advanced Accounting 4 cr.

This course examines and analyzes complex accounting topics not previously covered in Intermediate Accounting. Topics covered include: organization, structure, aims and process used by the FASB; basics of consolidated financial statements; current value accounting; basics of consolidated financial statements; accounting for not-for-profit organizations; governmental accounting; and other topics current in the field of accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 3304.

BIO 1028
Principles of Biology II 4 cr.

The Unity and Diversity of Life: Organisms, Ecology and Evolution. An introduction to biological principles centered on organisms, adaptation and evolution. The course will focus on the process of evolution and the diversity of higher organisms. The course will explore how and why all living organisms must deal with the transmission of information, with the capture and expenditure of energy, with transport of materials, and with self-regulation. Animal behavior will also be considered. The course will have an integrated lecture and laboratory and will stress the relationships between organismal adaptation, form, function, ecological relationships and evolution. Prerequisites BIO 1027 or consent of instructor. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core (pending approval). 

BIO 3009
Environment, Ecology and Society 4 cr.

The course engages students to inquire the linkages between ecological systems, human systems and human perturbations of natural ecological systems. Emphasis is placed on applied environmental issues that currently confront the planet. Students will also discuss the process of biological/ecological inquiry and the nature of science. This course will acquaint students with some of the social, economic, political, and ethical aspects of environmental problems following an introduction to the basic principles of ecology - the study of the interactions among organisms and their physical environment. The future of our society depends on whether Homo sapiens can learn to live in harmony with the global ecosystem so that it can support civilization. Knowing how the world ecosystem works permits more than knowledgeable participation in the great decisions of our day. Consideration will be given to alternative ways of organizing our society in accordance with sound ecological principles. Students will read several topical papers and conduct a semester-long investigation on an approved topic. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core (pending approval). 

BUS 2205
Principles of Marketing 4 cr.

The marketing course introduces marketing as a functional area of a business enterprise. You will study numerous marketing concepts and functions, including the marketing concept, the marketing mix, buyer behavior, market segmentation, product position, and marketing research, all within a global context. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 0091, BUS 0092, BUS 0093. 

BUS 2215
Managerial Finance 4 cr.

This course introduces the basics of a standard finance course. The goal is to provide a comfortable level of understanding of financial markets and securities for all business majors. The course will develop the financial skills and knowledge that will help them interact with the other functions of the firm to make good managerial decisions. The main topics included in the course are outlined under six main areas: (1) financial markets and institutions in a global environment; (2) financial ratios, budgeting, a firm’s pro forma financial statements, and cash flows determining firm value; (3) time value of money tools and concepts (compounding, discounting, annuities, and perpetuities); (4) relationship between risk and return; and (5) the basics of bond & stock valuation. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 2203 & BUS 2213. 

BUS 2220
Operations Management 4 cr.

The course is designed to provide students majoring in business administration with an overview of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of operations management (OM). The focus of operations in the process of converting or transforming resources into products and services. The principal responsibilities of operations managers lie in making sound, cost-effective decisions that increase the productivity and competitiveness of both manufacturing and service organizations. The process of planning, implementing and monitoring the production allows operations managers to continuously improve in providing high quality goods and services at low cost thereby adding more value for the customer. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 0091, BUS 0092, BUS 0093, BUS 2203 & BUS 2213. Fulfills X in LS Core. 

BUS 4402
Strategic Analysis and Decision Making 4 cr.

BUS 4402 is a capstone course that exposes students to issues that concern the firm as a whole. Through the use of “real-world” case studies and sophisticated practitioner journal articles, students will be called upon to grapple with such strategic issues as sizing up an organization’s standing in the marketplace, differentiating between winning and mediocre strategies, and spotting ways to improve a company’s strategy execution. In this course student teams will meet with the teaching team one hour per week to discuss their analysis of the assigned readings and cases. Prerequisite: BUS 3302. Fulfills X in LS Core. 

CHM 1000
Adventures in Chemistry 4 cr.

This chemistry course is for non-science majors. Topics include the scientific method, radioactivity, atomic structure, basic principles of chemistry as they apply to air and water pollution, and the political ramifications of worldwide chemical use. No prerequisite. Offered every semester. Not open to science and engineering majors or any student that has completed any other chemistry course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. 

CHM 1120
General Chemistry II 4 cr.

Science and engineering students will take this course. A continuation of CHM 1110. Topics include aqueous solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium calculations, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: CHM 1110. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Offered every spring semester. 

CHM 2220
Organic Chemistry II 4 cr.

A continuation of CHM 2210. The chemistry of aromatic compounds is introduced, and strong emphasis is given to the chemistry of organic compounds containing the carbonyl and amine functional groups. The application of organic reactions in multistep synthesis and the biological applications are emphasized. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is introduced. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: CHM 2210. Offered every semester. 

COM 2401
Introduction to Mass Communication 4 cr.

This course focuses on the basic principles of mass communication and its historical development. Issues explored include media access, media ethics, media effects, and current trends in the growth of digital and wireless mass communication technologies. Students examine the role of the media industry in reinforcing and challenging dominant values, attitudes, and beliefs central to American culture. An additional feature of the course studies how mass media-created ideals have been disseminated internationally, as well as how media businesses reflect, influence and sometimes defy societal norms. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own independent mass media project. No prerequisite. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

ENG2050
Introduction to Literary Studies 4 cr.

Study of literary genres (poetry, fiction and drama) and development of informed approaches to reading through various interpretive methodologies. Focus on various assumptions, goals and strategies that inform the reading process.  Satisfies Institutional Writing Intensive requirement.  Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills AL and W in LS Core. 

FAA 1230
2-Dimensional Design 4 cr.

Introduction to the vocabulary and grammar of visual composition. The basic design elements of figure-ground, point, line, shape, tone, color, texture, pattern and space will be explored through the project assignments. Concept, content, composition, and craft will be looked at as interlocking components. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. 

FAA 1320
History of Rock & Roll 4 cr.

This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core.

HSC 1123/HSC 1123L
Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr.
Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

This course continues the human anatomy and physiology topics and includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide an opportunity for the student to further develop and apply the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body. Prerequisite: HSC1122. 

HSC1104
Introduction to Human Disease 4 cr.

The course will offer an introduction to human disease appropriate for students of all majors. The human body is a masterpiece of art. The more one understands the functioning of the body, the greater appreciation one has for it. Disease states, the body’s natural attempts to right what is wrong and the compensatory actions involved will be discussed. The general mechanisms of disease as well as specific body systems will be discussed from a human-interest point of view. The course focuses on basic medical concepts that are useful to every student and encourages them to become a medical advocate for themselves or for family members. It is so important to understand doctors and your health care plan, to be able to ask important questions, and to know what questions to ask. In addition, the course will cover many diseases that are ‘in the news’ and allow the student to gain some knowledge and insight into the myths and facts surrounding these diseases. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

HSC 2300
Nutrition, Diet and Health 4 cr.

Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

HSC 3103
Global Public Health 4 cr.

Global public health is a study of the biological, socioeconomic and environmental contributors to health and disease in populations around the world. Students will investigate the determinants of health, how health status is measured, and will review the burden of disease, risk factors and approaches to global cooperation to address health problems within and between nations for successful interventions. Specific issues underlying strategies and organization for health care delivery and health services will be discussed, and linked to community service projects that aim to develop social responsibility through civic engagement and humanitarian activities. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. 

HIS 3439
Slavery and Race in the Early Modern Atlantic World, 1400-1800 4 cr.

Between 1450 and 1850 more than twelve million men, women and children were forced to leave Africa to face slavery in Europe and the Americas. Employing a thematic and comparative approach, this course examines the emergence, development, and significance of plantation slavery in the Atlantic World between 1400 and 1800. It will focus on four interrelated questions: First, how can we explain the emergence and development of large-scale chattel slavery in the Americas? Second, what is the relationship between the emergence of chattel slavery and the evolution of racialized thinking in the Early Modern Atlantic period? Third, what did it mean to be enslaved, and what was similar and different about the experience of enslavement across time and space in the Atlantic World? Finally, how did African men, women and children and their descendants understand, respond and even resist their enslavement? Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H and D in LS Core. 

MGT 3357
International Management 4 cr.

This course focuses on the basic elements that one must understand when doing business across borders. The primary purpose of the course is to create awareness of and sensitivity to the decisions confronting the multinational business in order to prepare individuals to support companies’ moves from domestic to foreign environments. Students analyze the various external forces faced by geocentric leaders/managers. They examine operational issues and develop business strategies necessary for success in the global race for profitable growth. Lectures, class discussions, and case analyses help students to explore management and economic issues critical to the success of a geocentric employee/manager. Prerequisites: ECO 1203 and ECO 1204, or ECO 1201. 

MTH 1016
Precalculus 4 cr.

This course develops students’ mathematical problem-solving skills and prepares students for courses in calculus and science. Emphasis is on the creation and use of functions and graphs to explain the relationship between quantities in applied problems. Types of functions investigated include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and their inverses. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Fulfills Q in LS Core. 

PHL 1000
Introduction to Philosophy 4 cr.

A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor. Fulfills PHL in LS Core.

PHL 2200 (W)
History of Ancient Philosophy 4 cr.

From the beginnings of their literature, the ancient Greeks displayed a steady concern and even preoccupation with what human beings may know and what may lie concealed from our knowing. This course will provide a survey of Greek philosophical thought organized around the theme of the problem of human knowledge, beginning with the Presocratics, then turning to dialogues by Plato and Aristotle’s comprehensive approach to nature and human knowledge, and concluding with the Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics. Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills W in LS Core.

PHY2202
General Physics II 

The second part of a one-year introduction, without calculus, to the elements of physics. Topics include mechanics, electricity, magnetism, optics, waves, and (time permitting) thermodynamics and modern physics. Prerequisite: MTH 1000 or equivalent and PHY2201. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. 

POL1000
Current Issues in Politics 4 cr.

An introduction to the field of political science designed for non-majors and undecided majors.  This course examines several current policy controversies in the political arena and explores how they can be understood using common concepts and theories in the discipline.  The course will focus on current policy debates such as: What to do about low voter turnout? How should the US relate to other countries in the world? Does the legal system produce justice? 

POL 3113
The American Presidency 4 cr.

This course will examine the constraints which limit presidents, the opportunities that presidents can seize, and the virtues which maximize their prospects for success. The objective of this course is to broaden your understanding of how this uniquely personalized institution developed, its constitutional authority, its relationship with other branches of government and how one gets selected for this office. Finally we will assess its current strengths and weaknesses and discuss the perception and reality of presidential power and leadership. Prerequisite: POL 1100 or consent of the instructor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

PSY 2110
Statistical Methods in Psychology 4 cr.

Introduction to analysis of data in psychology. Emphasis on the logic, use, and interpretation of inferential statistics, including the following: correlation and regression, single-sample and two-sample t-tests, analysis of variance and chi square. Prerequisite: PSY1100W, MTH1000 or placing out of MTH1000 on the math placement test. Fulfills Q in LS Core. 

PSY 3410
Adult Psychopathology 4 cr.


Examination of basic issues in psychopathology. Focus on description, etiology and treatment of neurosis, character disorder, and psychosis from varying theoretical and clinical perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. 

RTS1100
Christianity in Context 4 cr.

As an introduction to Christianity, this course will investigate a number of the “contexts” in which it began, in which it developed, and in which we find it today. Students will study Christianity in the historical contexts within the ancient world and of ancient Judaism, in the literary contexts of the Christian Bible and its interpretation, in the intellectual context of church history, and in contemporary global contexts. In keeping with the College’s Augustinian identity, mission, and vision, this course will also highlight the contributions of St. Augustine. Satisfies the first institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. Fulfills RTS in LS Core.

RTS3710
Theology Through Women’s Eyes 4 cr.

Attentive both to women’s contributions to the Christian tradition and to views of women articulated in the Christian tradition, this course examines the significance of women’s experiences for theological and ethical reflection.  It explores the implications of this for theological reflection on such topics as the human person, Christ, the Trinity, the Church and the liturgy as well as for ethical reflection on such topics as family, bioethics and social ethics. 

SOC1001
Principles of Sociology 4 cr.

The objectives of this introductory course are: (1) to cultivate the sociological perspective by acquainting students with basic sociological theories, methods, concepts and findings; (2) to use the basic concepts and principles of sociology to examine the various sectors of social life; and, (3) to develop an awareness of how and why social forces influence the experiences of everyday life. The course usually begins with a brief review of sociology’s historical origin, its major theoretical perspectives and its various research methodologies. The nature of culture, social interaction, group dynamics, bureaucracy, socialization, deviance, crime, urbanization, collective behavior, and social change are some of the topics studied. The course also explores some of the institutions of society, such as the family, the political economy, religion, education, and the medical system. A central focus of the course is understanding the nature of social inequality as it exists in the United States and across the globe in terms of age, gender, race, and social class. 

SPA 1120
Introductory Spanish II 4 cr.

This course is offered for students with little or no background in Spanish. Oral-aural Proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including mandatory language lab. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language. Prerequisite SPA 1110 or permission of the instructor. Fulfills FL in LS Core. 

SPM 3005
Sport Marketing 4 cr.

Marketing is a critical function in the sport organization. Sport marketing exposes students to the dynamics of marketing a sport organization. Topics include promotion, public relations, event sponsorship, strategic marketing, consumer behavior, and brand management. Prerequisites: BUS 2205 and SPM 3000. 

WGS 1010
Gender and Society 4 cr.

This course will explore current attitudes about women, men and differently gendered persons in Western society, approaching women’s, men’s and differently gendered person’s experiences through insights provided by feminist thought on such areas as race and ethnicity, work, education, media, family, gender, sexuality, religion, and politics. Among the questions the course will consider are: Why is it important to study how gender is constructed? Why have women been treated differently than men in society? What is patriarchy? And how is power distributed based on gender? Required for Women’s Studies Minor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core. 

WGS 2100
History of Women in Science and Mathematics 4 cr.

A survey of the role of women in both traditional science as we know it today and the work women did in ancient times as mid-wives, astronomers, mathematicians, chemists, pediatricians, pharmacists, botanists, epidemiologists, psychologists, etc. from the birth of science and mathematics in ancient times to this century, the major breakthroughs in science will be addressed in parallel with what women were doing in science. Biographies of women scientists and mathematicians in various fields and time periods will serve as examples to illustrate the evolution of science and mathematics and the key roles women have played in that evolution. How have women changed science and mathematics as their numbers in different fields increase? Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills D in LS Core.