Spring Semester 2020

Courses are offered from January through May and are subject to change. Questions?

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Visiting Students

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Refund Policy

Full refund - prior to end of first week | 50% refund - prior to end of second week
25% refund - prior to end of third week | No refund - after the third week

Tuition and Fees 

Courses Offered

Business

Accounting

  • ACC4406C-A Advanced Accounting
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

This course examines and analyzes complex accounting topics not previously covered in Intermediate Accounting. Topics covered include: organization, structure, aims and process used by the FASB; basics of consolidated financial statements; current value accounting; accounting for not-for-profit organizations; governmental accounting; and other topics current in the field of accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 3304. Four hours a week.

Business

  • BUS1100C-A Introduction to Business
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Tues 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

(Formerly BE100A)Primarily for freshmen, the course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the functional areas of business while emphasizing oral and written communication and effective group interaction. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of business through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technological applications and outside activities.  Four hours per  week.

  • BUS2205C-A Principles of Marketing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Wed 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

The marketing course introduces marketing as a functional area of a business enterprise. You will study numerous marketing concepts and functions, including the marketing concept, the marketing mix, buyer behavior, market segmentation, product position, and marketing research, all within a global context. Prerequisites: BUS1100. Four hours a week.

  • BUS2215C-A Managerial Finance
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Thurs 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

This course introduces the basics of a standard finance course. The goal is to provide a comfortable level of understanding of financial markets and securities for all business majors. The course will develop the financial skills and knowledge that will help them interact with the other functions of the firm to make good managerial decisions. The main topics included in the course are outlined under five main areas: (1) financial markets and institutions in a global environment; (2) financial ratios, budgeting, a firm’s pro forma financial statements, and cash flows determining firm value; (3) time value of money tools and concepts (compounding, discounting, annuities, and perpetuities); (4) relationship between risk and return; and (5) the basics of bond & stock valuation. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 2203, MTH 1003 (or course equivalent: MTH 1016, 1115, or 1217), and ECO1201. Four hours a week.

  • BUS4402WC-A Strategic Analysis and Decision Making - WI
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Tues 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

BUS4402 is a capstone course that exposes students to issues that concern the firm as a whole. Through the use of “real-world” case studies and sophisticated practitioner journal articles, students will be called upon to grapple with such strategic issues as sizing up an organization’s standing in the marketplace, differentiating between winning and mediocre strategies, and spotting ways to improve a company’s strategy execution. In this course student teams will meet with the teaching team one hour per week to discuss their analysis of the assigned readings and cases. Prerequisite: BUS1100 and all required BUS2xxx courses. Fulfills X and W in LS Core. Four hours a week.

  • MTH1003C-A Intro Math For Business
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: On-Campus
  • Days/Week: Wed 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

A one-semester course designed to develop algebraic and quantitative problem-solving skills. Students will use algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as matrices and fundamental concepts of probability to solve applied problems selected primarily from the field of business. This course is not open to students who have credit for any math course numbered MTH 1115 or higher.  Fulfills Q in LS Core.  Four hours a week.

Management

  • MGT3310C-A Organizational Behavior
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Wed 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed through the Business Enterprise core courses. The course will focus on individual and group level organizational behavior within domestic and international contexts, with specific emphasis on leadership, power, communication, negotiation, organizational change and self-managed team processes. This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of behavioral theories and provide them with opportunities to apply that learning to inter-personal, group and organizational problems. This is an experiential course and it is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in business or related areas. Prerequisite BUS1100 and Sophomore standing or permission.  Fulfills X in LS Core.  Four hours a week.

  • MGT3355C-A Diversity in the Workplace
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

This course, which may include a significant service learning component, explores the workplace dynamics related to people’s similarities and differences in characteristics such as race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and physical and mental ability. Topics include perception and attribution, the social construction of identity, privilege, power relations, discrimination, prejudice, stereotypes, and approaches businesses and other organizations take to address issues of workplace diversity. Prerequisite: BUS1100 and Sophomore standing. (Priority registration for MG and IB concentrates, remaining space available for other concentrates). Fulfills D in LS Core.

Health Science

Health Science

  • HSC2300C-A Intro to Nutritional Sciences
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition.  The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored.   Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core.  Four hours a week.

Liberal Arts

English

  • ENG1550C-A Major American Authors
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

One-semester course designed to introduce students to American literature through the study of writers representing a range of cultures and literary traditions.  Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

History

  • HIS1119C-A The European Experience: Antiquity to the Reformation
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Wed 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

The European Experience:  Antiquity to the Reformation. This course examines the major events and developments in European history from  ancient civilizations through the Renaissance and Reformation, with particular emphasis upon the political context, the causes and implications of social and economic change, and cultural evolution. This course is not open to students who have received credit for World Civilization I. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills H in LS Core.  Three hours a week.

Philosophy

  • PHL1000C-A Introduction to Philosophy
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom.  We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact?  Is ethics just relative to each person or society?  Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens?  Does God exist?  The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is.  The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor. Fulfills PHL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

  • PHL2090C-A Values in Technological Culture
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

A critical examination of the way in which technological innovation has shaped our modern culture. Students will study major ethical traditions, pursue individual research projects on particular areas of technology, suggest solutions to ethical problems that arise there, and report their conclusions. Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills E in LS Core. Three hours a week.

Religious and Theological Studies

  • RTS1010C-A World Religions
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Days/Week: Tues 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

This course is an introduction to a variety of the world’s religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Indigenous Traditions, Christianity, Islam, and Taoism.  We examine origins, beliefs, practices, sacred texts, and historical and cultural aspects.  Special attention will be given to Christianity and Catholicism.  We will also examine St. Augustine’s life and ideas using various sources.  Satisfies the first institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. Fulfills RTS in LS Core.

Sociology

  • SOC1000C-A The Sociological Imagination
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

The objectives of this introductory course are: (1) to cultivate the sociological perspective by acquainting students with basic sociological theories, methods, concepts and findings; (2) to use the basic concepts and principles of sociology to examine the various sectors of social life; and, (3) to develop an awareness of how and why social forces influence the experiences of everyday life. The course usually begins with a brief review of sociology’s historical origin, its major theoretical perspectives and its various research methodologies. The nature of culture, social interaction, group dynamics, bureaucracy, socialization, deviance, crime, urbanization, collective behavior, and social change are some of the topics studied. The course also explores some of the institutions of society, such as the family, the political economy, religion, education, and the medical system. A central focus of the course is understanding the nature of social inequality as it exists in the United States and across the globe in terms of age, gender, race, and social class. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.

World Languages

  • WLC1000C-A International Cultures, Customs, and Languages
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: On-Campus
  • Days/Week: Thurs 6 p.m. - 9:50 p.m.

This course explores the culture (or cultures) of a non-English-speaking country. The course aims to stimulate cultural curiosity and cross-cultural communication, along with providing practical knowledge of the customs and culture(s) of the specfic country that will be covered each semester. The aspects of the country’s culture that will be covered include Culture and Arts, Social values, Food and other customs, Economics, Geography, History, Politics, Demographics and other social issues such as immigration/emigration, the environment, and mass media. There will also be a language component at the introductory level to provide students with the tools to navigate the target culture. This course is available exclusively for Degree Completion students who are taking courses through Professional Studies. Fulfills FL in LS Core for GPS students.

Education and Social Justice

Criminology

  • CRM2000C-A Youth, Deviance and Crime
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online

This course focuses on the social problem of youth and crime and the ways that this problem is defined and addressed through formal and informal means in society. What are the sources of juvenile delinquency? How are other social institutions (family, schools, economy) related to the decisions of youths to engage in deviant and/or unlawful behavior? How are the issues or race/ethnicity, social class, age and gender, and sexuality implicated in who is defined as delinquent and how they are treated by the larger society? Particular attention will be given to the history of the juvenile justice system and how it currently functions (police, courts, corrections). Non-punitive approaches to addressing this problem will also be covered (e.g. community-based corrections, restorative justice). Prerequisite: CRM 1000 or SOC1001 or SOC3200 or consent of the instructor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.