Summer Session 2020

Courses run during four sessions from May 18 until August 14 unless noted otherwise. If you are currently in high school, be sure to view our recommended courses for high school students. Please email us with your questions and review our tuition and fees

Registration is now open.

Please note: Courses are subject to change.


Summer I:
May 18 - June 26, 2020 
Summer II:
July 6 - August 14, 2020 
Summer III:
May 18 - August 14, 2020 
Summer VIII - 8 week:
May 18 - July 16, 2020 


Return to Main Menu

All Courses Are Offered Online

  • Summer Session course instruction occurs completely online.
  • There are no on-campus meetings.
  • Courses are asynchronous - class materials can be accessed at any time specified by your professor.  

Business

Accounting

  • ACC4408C-A Auditing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course provides a strong conceptual and practical approach to auditing. Emphasis is placed on auditing theory, supplemented with practice work papers and discussions with selected representatives of the accounting profession. Prerequisite: BUS2203 and MTH1003 (or course equivalent: MTH1016, 1115, or 1217). Fulfills X in LS Core.
  • ACC3304C-A Intermediate Accounting II
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Days/Week: Tues, 7:30-9:00PM (synchronous class; meeting day and time required - online)
  • Summer II
The second course in the Intermediate Accounting sequence. The central theme of the course is financial accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by which it is governed. The objective of the course is to allow students to develop a sophisticated comprehension of GAAP, its underlying theories, and corresponding practices, procedures, and techniques employed in their application. Intermediate Accounting II concentrates on student application to sources of economic resources (liabilities and equity).  Prerequisite: ACC 3303.

Business

  • BUS2213C-B Business Statistics
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Provides an introduction to fundamental statistical principles and procedures. Topics include descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions and sampling distributions, statistical inference and estimation, linear regression and correlation. Prerequisites: BUS1100 and MTH1003 (or course equivalent: MTH1001/MTH1002, or MTH1016, or MTH1115, or MTH1217). Fulfills Q in LS Core.
  • BUS2220C-A Operations Management
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
The course is designed to provide students majoring in business administration with an overview of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of operations management (OM). The focus of operations in the process of converting or transforming resources into products and services. The principal responsibilities of operations managers lie in making sound, cost-effective decisions that increase the productivity and competitiveness of both manufacturing and service organizations. The process of planning, implementing and monitoring the production allows operations managers to continuously improve in providing high quality goods and services at low cost thereby adding more value for the customer. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 2203 & BUS 2213. Fulfills X in LS Core.  
  • BUS4402WC-A Strategic Analysis & Decision Making
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
BUS4402 is a capstone course that exposes students to issues that concern the firm as a whole. Through the use of “real-world” case studies and sophisticated practitioner journal articles, students will be called upon to grapple with such strategic issues as sizing up an organization’s standing in the marketplace, differentiating between winning and mediocre strategies, and spotting ways to improve a company’s strategy execution. In this course student teams will meet with the teaching team one hour per week to discuss their analysis of the assigned readings and cases. Prerequisite: BUS1100 and all required BUS2xxx courses. Fulfills X and W in LS Core.

Finance

  • FIN4406C-A International Finance
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course covers the environment of multinational financial management, international financial markets with emphasis on the foreign exchange market, international flow of funds, relationships between exchange rates and economic variables, as well as hedging techniques and international arbitrage. This course also examines international capital budgeting, short-term financing and investment, and foreign direct investment.Prerequisite(s): BUS 2215.

Management

  • MGT3320C-A Employment Law & Labor Relations
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course will introduce the student to the historical and cultural development of the legal, ethical and regulatory environment of modern business as it relates to the employment relationship. Topics will include common law rules governing the relationships of employer-employee, principal-agent and employer-independent contractor. An examination of important statutory rules shall include the Occupational Safety and Health Act, National Labor Relations Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act together with its progeny the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Equal Pay Act. Prerequisites: BUS 2225 and BUS 2227.
  • MGT3325C-A Ethics and Social Responsibility
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Ethics and Social Responsibility provides students with opportunities to examine the meaning of business ethics and the social responsibility of business in light of the numerous high profile challenges that managers face in the current business environment. Varying ethical approaches will be applied to ethical leadership and the management of conflicting values confronting business leaders on a daily basis.  The more global issue of balancing principles of good business with priciples of ethical behavior in various cultures will be discussed. Students will participate in a significant service-learning project in this course. Satisfies the E and X requirements in LS Core. Prerequisites:  Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.
  • MGT4900C-A Special Topics in Management: Project Management
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Organizations perform projects in order to achieve a set of objectives. Project management is the application of knowledge, skills and techniques to fulfill project objectives and requirements. Whether it is to redesign an existing process, develop a new product, plan an event or deliver a service to a customer, project management is necessary to most effectively meet schedule, cost and scope expectations. This course will cover traditional project management practice guidelines defined by the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) PMBOK® - Sixth Edition, including project initiation and planning, executing and controlling projects as well as specific knowledge areas that contribute to project success. Additionally, specialized and contemporary project management practices such as Agile, Scrum and Hybrid will be explored. Students will apply concepts through class assignments and case studies as well as the development of an actionable project plan.

Marketing

  • MKT3303C-A Advertising and Promotions
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
The basic principles of advertising, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, publicity, and personal selling, as well as other forms of promotion are studied. The course will examine the factors affecting promotional decisions as well as the development of effective marketing communication strategies. Topics include establishment of objectives, identifying target audiences, budgeting, formulation, design and testing of message, media selection, and analysis of effectiveness in the context of an integrated marketing plan and ethical considerations. Students will have an opportunity to apply their analytical and creative skills by developing actual TV, radio, and print ads as well as write press releases using real world, practical, and contemporary communication case studies.Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205.
  • MKT3400C-A Social Media Marketing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Businesses are currently facing a fundamental change in the ways that consumers interact with brands and each other. Social media has connected consumers with family and friends while also giving them considerable power over marketers and brands. This course offers an overview of how marketing has changed due to the increasing prominence of social media as a digital marketing tool. The curriculum of this course is designed to equip students with the relevant knowledge, perspectives, and practical skills required to both develop and present an effective social media marketing strategy. Prerequisite: BUS2205.

Sport Management

  • SPM3005C-A Sports Marketing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Marketing is a critical function in the sport organization.  Sport marketing exposes students to the dynamics of marketing a sport organization.  Topics include promotion, public relations, event sponsorship, strategic marketing, consumer behavior, and brand management. Prerequisites: BUS 2205.  

Education and Social Policy

Criminology

  • CRM1000C-A Introduction to Criminology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course explores crime, justice, and punishment. In this course, the causes of crime and the solutions and policies in place to deter or solve crime will be critically examined. We will also examine the social processes whereby crime is defined and detected, and offenders are apprehended and punished. The overall objective of the course is to examine crime and punishment within the context of the society and culture which surrounds it. These topics are connected to inequalities of race, class, and gender, which will be key concerns throughout this course. Coverage of crime and punishment in the popular media is also a central focus of this course. Required for majors.Prerequisite(s): Social Science distribution requirement.Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core
  • CRM2900C-A Police Culture
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Police Culture is an introduction to the function and purpose of police operations. The course will examine the culture of American Policing today and include the study of police policy and procedure. Also included will be the study of organizational culture within law enforcement from a police officer’s perspective and the assessment of working environments within contemporary police departments.The effects of cultural diversity in law enforcement today will be examined in relation to traditional law enforcement models. Topics will include women in law enforcement, religion, employment rights and occupational attitudes in police work. Emphasis will also be on the growing problems in the Criminal Justice System as a result of societal changes in law enforcement and how it affects police management.  Prerequisite: CRM1000.

Education

  • HDE1000C-A Introduction to Human Development
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course focuses on physical, cognitive, and social-emotional continuity and changes that occur throughout the lifespan. An introduction to research and theories in human development is included.

Health Sciences

Health Sciences

  • HSC1123C-A Anatomy & Physiology II w/lab
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course continues the human anatomy and physiology topics and includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide an opportunity for the student to further develop and apply the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body.Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122.
  • HSC3103C-A Global Public Health
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Global public health is a study of the biological, socioeconomic and environmental contributors to health and disease in populations around the world.  Students will investigate the determinants of health, how health status is measured, and will review the burden of disease, risk factors and approaches to global cooperation to address health problems within and between nations for successful interventions. Specific issues underlying strategies and organization for health care delivery and health services will be discussed and linked to community service projects that aim to develop social responsibility through civic engagement and humanitarian activities. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement.  
  • HSC2300C-B Intro to Nutritional Sciences
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition.  The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored.   Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core.  
  • HSC3302C-B Intro to Public Health
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Public health aims to understand the occurrence and causes of disease within populations with the goal of prevention and health promotion, through changes in individual behavior, control of infectious disease and environmental health factors, and social and political organization for health improvement. The aim will be to describe the patterns of selected diseases in populations, to explain the causation of disease at the cell/physiological to social levels, to predict disease occurrence and to control disease through prevention strategies aimed at individuals, communities and governments. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a STEM requirement and X in LS Core.  
  • SME1104C-B Introduction to Physical Activity, Fitness, and Wellness
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course is a survey of the discipline of health and fitness, including knowledge derived from performing physical activity, studying about physical activity, and professional practice centered in physical activity. It includes an analysis of the importance of health and wellness in daily life, the relationship between physical activity and the discipline of kinesiology, and the general effects of physical activity experiences. The course surveys the general knowledge base of the Health Science discipline as reflected in the major sub disciplines and reviews selected concepts in each, showing how they contribute to our understanding of the nature and importance of physical activity. The students will learn about the fitness components of wellness; flexibility, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, nutrition, weight management, and cancer. Fitness and other positive lifestyle habits that lead to better health, improved quality of life, and total well-being will be discussed. Students will be responsible for developing a self-paced fitness program that will be followed for the duration of the semester.  In addition, the course introduces students to the general  and specific characteristics of the health and wellness professions. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core.

Liberal Arts

Communication and Media

  • COM2401C-A Introduction to Media
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course focuses on the basic principles of mass communication and its historical development.  Issues explored include media access, media ethics, media effects, and current trends in the growth of digital and wireless mass communication technologies.  Students examine the role of the media industry in reinforcing and challenging dominant values, attitudes, and beliefs central to American culture.  An additional feature of the course studies how mass media-created ideals have been disseminated internationally, as well as how media businesses reflect, influence and sometimes defy societal norms.  Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own independent mass media project.  No prerequisite. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.  
  • COM3401C-A Principles of Public Relations
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course presents an overview of basic public relations principles, concepts and relation of theory and practice. Students will explore the field of professional public relations covering the role, origin and trends affecting the future of the practice. Special emphasis will be placed on problem solving and the tools and techniques of the trade as applied to real-life situations. The scope of the course will also examine the foundations of public relations as a communications discipline, as understood historically in the role of society, public opinion, effective strategy and tactics, process, identification of public, publicity techniques and effective use of media. Moreover, the course will address ethical and legal implications of the profession.
  • COM1020C-A Public Communication
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course focuses on the concepts and practices associated with effective public communication.  A central aspect of this course entails the mastering of public speaking through the process of researching, preparing, and delivering presentations in a variety of formats (e.g., informative, persuasive, and impromptu).  The classroom is a laboratory in which to develop the skills needed for effective public communication.  In addition, students will also analyze public speaking events as a means of developing a critical understanding of the public communication process.  No prerequisite.

English

  • ENG1050C-B Intro to College Writing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Introduction to the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the foundations of academic discourse, with attention to language, purpose, and context. Students will read and analyze texts to prepare them to write for different audiences. Will include library instruction, research, and documentation. Fulfills first year writing requirement in LS Core. Does not count toward English major or minor.
  • ENG1050C-C Intro to College Writing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Introduction to the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the foundations of academic discourse, with attention to language, purpose, and context. Students will read and analyze texts to prepare them to write for different audiences. Will include library instruction, research, and documentation. Fulfills first year writing requirement in LS Core. Does not count toward English major or minor.
  • ENG2050C-A Intro to Literary Studies
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course introduces students to such traditional literary genres as fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as newer and emerging forms such as the graphic novel, creative non-fiction, digital storytelling, and film. Emphasis is given to teaching students to read closely and to write analytically. The course also familiarizes students with a variety of interpretive strategies. Students leave the course recognizing the value of close reading and self-conscious interpretation.  Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills AL in LS Core.
  • ENG2150C-A Introduction to Creative Writing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Introduces the main genres of creative writing, including poetry, memoir, and fiction.  In addition to producing their own creative forms such as poems, song lyrics, literary memoir, and short stories, students will study the works of contemporary and canonical authors  in each genre.  Classwork includes the workshopping of both short and longer projects and will culminate in a portfolio of revised work.  Fulfills an AL requirement in LS Core.

History

  • HIS1106C-A U.S. History: From Pre-Contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.Fulfills: H in LS Core
  • HIS1106C-B U.S. History: From Pre-Contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.Fulfills: H in LS Core

Philosophy

  • PHL2060C-A Biomedical Ethics
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
A critical examination of moral issues in medicine and bioethics.  Topics will be selected from among the following: the physician relationship; informed consent; research ethics; issues at the end of life including euthanasia and physician assisted suicide; the allocation of scarce medical resources; race and gender in medicine; reproductive and genetic control, etc.  Ethical theories and principles will be introduced to help analyze the chosen issues. Prerequisite:  PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills E in LS Core.
  • PHL2070C-A Environmental Ethics
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Environmental Ethics concerns humanity’s relationship with nature. In addition to questions about our moral obligations to other humans, animals, plants, ecosystems, and future generations, the course will also look at recent work on the Land Ethic, Ecofascism, Deep Ecology, Global Ecocentrism, Ecofeminism, Social Ecology, and Sustainability. We will begin with a brief look at some background texts before turning to philosophical analysis of such contemporary issues as climate change, renewable energy, pollution, and sustainability. Prerequisite: a 1000-level philosophy course. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills E in LS Core.
  • PHL1000C-B Introduction to Philosophy
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom.  We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact?  Is ethics just relative to each person or society?  Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens?  Does God exist?  The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is.  The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor. Fulfills PHL in LS Core.
  • PHL2090C-A Values in Technological Culture
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
A critical examination of the way in which technological innovation has shaped our modern culture. Students will study major ethical traditions, pursue individual research projects on particular areas of technology, suggest solutions to ethical problems that arise there, and report their conclusions. Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills E in LS Core.

Political Science

  • POL3140C-A Mass Media and American Politics
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course examines of the role of the media in shaping political opinions and behavior. The role of the media in setting political agendas and reporting and interpreting political events will be examined. The nature and influence of public opinion in a democratic society will be studied. Sophomore or above standing.  Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  • POL1100C-A Politics of the US
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
An introduction to the American political system, this course examines (1) the Constitutional basis of American politics, (2) the national institutions that are involved in decision-making and public debate (for example, the Presidency and the bureaucracy, the Federal Courts, the Congress, political parties, the media), (3) issues that Americans argue about (rights and liberties, economic benefits, foreign policy), and the processes by which those arguments are conducted and resolved (campaigns and elections, administrative action, legislation, lobbying, publicity). Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and X in LS Core.

Psychology

  • PSY3250C-C Cultural Psychology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Analyzes current theories and research on culture, race and ethnicity; and explores the ways in which the individual, social relations and culture mutually constitute each other. The course analyzes the rich interconnections between language and culture, and the role of culture in the construction of self and higher-order psychological processes.  Students will examine cultural groups within and outside of the United States. Also includes consideration of cultural issues in the interpretation of personal experience and the role of cultural diversity in contemporary society.  Prerequisite: PSY 1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  • PSY1000C-B Introduction to Psychology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Provides a general overview of the wide-ranging field of psychology. Students will explore major concepts and issues in the study of human thinking, feeling, and acting. These include biological foundations of behavior and experience, how people learn and develop, how individuals perceive the world, individual differences in behavior, social influence and social relations, the difference between normative and non-normative behavior, and approaches to therapy. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement  in LS core.
  • PSY2400C-A Personality
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Introduces classical and contemporary thinking on the concept of ‘personality’.  Explores the contributions of several important theoretical frameworks in personality theory including psychoanalysis, phenomenology, trait theory, and learning. Prerequisite: PSY 1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  • PSY2470C-A The Psychology of Trauma
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
Explores the psychology of trauma and human resilience. This course explores the range of posttraumatic reactions to a variety of situations as they affect cognitive, emotional, somatic and interpersonal aspects of functioning.  Students will be exposed to an overview of the etiology of and prevailing theories about PTSD. Factors contributing to the resilience to trauma as well as societal, cultural, and historical influences on views of trauma will also be discussed.  Pre-requisite:  PSY1000, Introduction to Psychology.

Religious and Theological Studies

  • RTS3030C-A Humans, Earth, & the Sacred: Religion & the Environment
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course surveys different religious traditions and their understandings of nature and human relations to other humans, animals, environment, and cosmos. In each case we will be looking at how those belief systems, or worldviews, result in particular attitudes that affect the environment and other humans by influencing human actions in relation to nature, and in turn how those actions (and thus the worldviews) affect humans, animals, plants, earth, and space, often in unintended ways, such as the way that those on the bottom of the socio-economic ladder suffer greater hardship and health issues such as exposure to pollution or toxins, environmental illnesses, and poorer food sources. Attention will be paid to power structures inherent in religious ways of understanding the roles of humans in relation to nature. Course requires site visits outside of class.Fulfills: Second institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. D and X in LS Core.
  • RTS1010C-A World Religion
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course is an introduction to a variety of the world’s religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Indigenous Traditions, Christianity, Islam, and Taoism.  We examine origins, beliefs, practices, sacred texts, and historical and cultural aspects.  Special attention will be given to Christianity and Catholicism.  We will also examine St. Augustine’s life and ideas using various sources.  Satisfies the first institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. Fulfills RTS in LS Core.

Visual and Performing Arts

  • FAA1320C-B History of Rock & Roll
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style.  It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends.  Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills AL and X in LS Core.  

Women’s and Gender Studies

  • WGS3420C-A Gender, Race, and Media
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
In this hands-on course we will examine theories of gender, race, class, ethnicity and sexuality in mainstream and independent media. We will study who controls the media, whose story is told, and from what perspective.  A focus will be on the historical and current impact racial and gender stereotypes in the media have on individuals and communities.  We will examine how oppressed groups worldwide are portrayed in mainstream media and how they are using the media to tell their own stories. We will learn how various audiences interpret the media differently. Throughout the course we will address issues of social inequality in the media and forms of resistance and explore alternative media, global media, media literacy and media democracy.  Finally, students will put theory into practice and create group videos. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  • WGS2010C-A Introduction to Ethnic Studies
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the academic field of Ethnic Studies, and the interdisciplinary questions it poses about the way that race, ethnicity and racism structure our world.  Our focus is within a framework analyzing a range of themes and topics including the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality; issues of power and privilege; immigration; popular culture and representation.  The experiences of various communities of color will be explored including: African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos, Latinas, Native Americans and others.  This course will also introduce major debates and issues facing Ethnic Studies in the 21st century such as immigration rights, Diaspora and globalization.  A variety of mediums will be used in the course including historical and theoretical texts, newspaper articles, online postings, film and cultural analysis. Satisfies  a Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC and D in LS Core.  
  • WGS3300C-B US Women’s History
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
An examination of the history of women in America.  It will include history prior to colonization, beyond and to the present.  A look at women’s roles in US Society and the intersection of class, culture and ethnicity in shaping women’s historical experiences across time. The course will examine the transformations and continuities in women’s lives as well as the political, social, economic and cultural factors that inspired, infused or inhibited women’s changing roles. This class also explores the ways in which race, class and ethnicity have operated to unite and divide disparate groups of women. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.  Fulfills H and D in LS Core.

World Languages and Cultural Studies

  • ITA1110C-A Introductory Italian I
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Days/Week: T/W/TH, 6:00-9:50PM (synchronous class; meeting days and time required - online)
  • Summer II
This course is offered for absolute beginners only.  This course is not open to heritage speakers or students with any prior study of Italian.  Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book.  Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language.  Prerequisite:  no Italian classes on High School Transcript.  Fulfills FL in LS Core.

Science and Engineering

Biology

  • BIO1106C-A Human Biology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
An introduction to the structure and function of human body at the level of cells, tissues organs and organ systems. A special emphasis is placed on the functions of the nervous and endocrine systems and their role in homeostasis and the integration and regulation of the functions of the other tissues and organs. The course will also consider molecular, Mendelian and population genetics. This course is designed primarily for students who intend to major or are majoring in Psychology or Human Development.Not open to Biology or Health Science majors or minors.Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.Note: Reserved for students majoring in Psychology or Human Development.Not open to biology or health sciences majors or minors.

Chemistry

  • CHM1000C-A Adventure in Chemistry
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
This chemistry course is for non-science majors. Topics include the scientific method, radioactivity, atomic structure, basic principles of chemistry as they apply to air and water pollution, and the political ramifications of worldwide chemical use. Not open to science and engineering majors or any student that has completed any other chemistry course.Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.

Math

  • MTH1000C-A Concepts in Algebra
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
A one semester course designed to develop fundamental algebraic and problem-solving concepts and skills. Topics include linear, quadratic, square root, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and equations. This course utilizes individual investigation, problem-solving, and writing in order to enhance students’ understanding of algebraic models and the problem-solving process. Students are expected to work independently, with the assistance of the professor and math fellow(s), through an online experience that is personalized and continuously adaptive based on individual performance. A laptop/iPad and a TI-83/84+ graphing calculator are required. This course is open only to students whose Placement Exam results indicate that they need further preparation for subsequent mathematics courses. Fulfills: Q in LS Core

Physics

  • PHY2211C-A Physics I (with laboratory)
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
First semester of a one-year calculus-based introduction to physics, for students in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, and others. Topics normally include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, rotational and orbital motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillations. Prerequisite(s): MTH 1217 or MTH 1016 with a final grade of B or higher and Corequisite: MTH 1217 Corequisite(s): PHY2001L (concurrent enrollment)Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.

Science and Engineering

  • MEN2050C-A Coding in MATLAB and 3D CAD
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • Summer II
An introduction to computer programming with an emphasis on engineering problem solving and an introduction to computer aided design will be presented. Students will work on solving a series of increasingly complex engineering problems using computer coding. Students will also learn to develop 3D CAD models for physical components.Prerequisite(s): GEN 1001.Corequisite(s): MTH 1217

Professional Development for Educators

See Courses