Summer Session 2019

Courses run during three sessions from May 20 until August 16 unless noted otherwise.  

All Merrimack College students should register through myMack.

Tuition for summer session is $375 per credit. All lab courses are $420 per credit. See tuition and fees

Please email us with your questions.

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Info for Registered Students

Summer I: May 20- June 28, 2019  Summer II: July 8 - August 16, 2019  Summer III: May 20 - August 16, 2019

Courses Offered

Business

Accounting

 ACC3304C-A Intermediate Accounting II 

  • Instructor: MJ Potvin | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

The second course in the Intermediate Accounting sequence. The central theme of the course is financial accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by which it is governed. The objective of the course is to allow students to develop a sophisticated comprehension of GAAP, its underlying theories, and corresponding practices, procedures, and techniques employed in their application. Intermediate Accounting II concentrates on student application to sources of economic resources (liabilities and equity). Prerequisite(s): ACC 3303.


  • ACC4407C-A Taxes 
  • Instructor: Jeff Murphy | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: M/W 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course covers federal income taxation concepts and principles primarily for individuals and corporations. Income recognition, deductions, tax calculations, capital gains and losses and tax accounting methods are discussed for various tax reporting entities. Tax differences between corporations, individuals and flow-through entities are covered. Prerequisite: BUS 2203 or permission of instructor. Four hours a week.


  • BUS2203C-A Accounting for Business 
  • Instructor: Susan Flaherty | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: T/R 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

A computer and project-based course designed to develop the students’ ability to read and interpret internal and external financial reports, understand their underlying concepts, use their information in making informed decisions, and understand the effects of management decisions on these reports and the financial performance of the business. Topics include the basic concepts of the accounting process, preparation of the financial statements, analysis and application of the generally accepted accounting principles used to account for the various elements of the balance sheet and income statement, accounting for manufacturing operations, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costing, budgeting, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: BUS1100. Four hours a week.

Finance

  • BUS2215C-A Managerial Finance
  • Instructor: Kevin Cignetti | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: W 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course introduces the basics of a standard finance course. The goal is to provide a comfortable level of understanding of financial markets and securities for all business majors. The course will develop the financial skills and knowledge that will help them interact with the other functions of the firm to make good managerial decisions. The main topics included in the course are outlined under five main areas: (1) financial markets and institutions in a global environment; (2) financial ratios, budgeting, a firm’s pro forma financial statements, and cash flows determining firm value; (3) time value of money tools and concepts (compounding, discounting, annuities, and perpetuities); (4) relationship between risk and return; and (5) the basics of bond & stock valuation. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 2203, MTH 1003 (or course equivalent: MTH 1016, 1115, or 1217), and ECO1201. Four hours a week.

Management

  • BUS2210C-A Management Information Systems
  • Instructor: Tahir Hameed | 4 Credits: | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

Management Information Systems presents a core of IS principles with which every business student should be familiar. Information technology has become a key component in accomplishing strategic and operational goals in organizations today. It is necessary to understand how a company utilizes information technology to gain its competitive advantage in business. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental concepts and principles of information systems. Therefore, it focuses on breadth of coverage rather than the depth of any specific IS area. Topics include: the role of IT in organizations, computers and information processing, hardware and software, managing data resources, telecommunications and networks, electronic commerce, security, IS ethics and leading information technologies and applications. Prerequisites: BUS1100. Four hours a week.


  • BUS2220C-A Operations Management 
  • Instructor: Bruce Han | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: M/W 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

The course is designed to provide students majoring in business administration with an overview of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of operations management (OM). The focus of operations in the process of converting or transforming resources into products and services. The principal responsibilities of operations managers lie in making sound, cost-effective decisions that increase the productivity and competitiveness of both manufacturing and service organizations. The process of planning, implementing and monitoring the production allows operations managers to continuously improve in providing high-quality goods and services at low cost thereby adding more value for the customer. Prerequisites: BUS 1100, BUS 2203 & BUS 2213. Fulfills X in LS Core.  Four hours a week.


  • BUS4402C-A Strategic Analysis & Decision Making 
  • Instructor: Martin Chatterton | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: M 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

BUS4402 is a capstone course that exposes students to issues that concern the firm as a whole. Through the use of “real-world” case studies and sophisticated practitioner journal articles, students will be called upon to grapple with such strategic issues as sizing up an organization’s standing in the marketplace, differentiating between winning and mediocre strategies, and spotting ways to improve a company’s strategy execution. In this course, student teams will meet with the teaching team one hour per week to discuss their analysis of the assigned readings and cases. Prerequisite: BUS1100 and all required BUS2xxx courses. Fulfills X in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • BUS4850C-A Business Enterprise Internship 
  • Instructor: Joe Jenkins | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

Paid and unpaid internships are an opportunity for students to gain experience in actual work settings where they can apply their classroom and other prior learning. Students work with their work setting supervisor and their professor to gain insights into the daily routines and the overall process, activities, and content of a particular setting or industry.  Internships may be in for-profit, not-for-profit or public sector organizations depending on the interests of the student. While there is no specific GPA requirement for the course, it is generally recommended that you have a minimum GPA of 2.70.  Permission must be obtained from the internship Professor prior to registration.  Fulfills X in LS Core.


  • BUS1100C-A Introduction to Business
  • Instructor: Leah Ritchie | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: T 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

Primarily for freshmen, the course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the functional areas of business while emphasizing oral and written communication and effective group interaction. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of business through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technological applications, and outside activities.


  • MGT3310C-A Organizational Behavior 
  • Instructor: Sirkwoo Jin | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: W 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed through the Business Enterprise core courses. The course will focus on individual and group level organizational behavior within domestic and international contexts, with specific emphasis on leadership, power, communication, negotiation, organizational change and self-managed team processes. This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of behavioral theories and provide them with opportunities to apply that learning to interpersonal, group and organizational problems. This is an experiential course and it is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in business or related areas. Prerequisite BUS1100 and Sophomore standing or permission.  Fulfills X in LS Core.  Four hours a week.


  • MGT3325C-A Ethics and Social Responsibility
  • Instructor: Linda Richelson | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

Ethics and Social Responsibility provides students with opportunities to examine the meaning of business ethics and the social responsibility of business in light of the numerous high profile challenges that managers faced in the past several years. We will focus on ethical leadership and the management of conflicting values confronting business leaders on a daily basis, as well as the more global issue of balancing principles of good business with principles of ethical behavior in various cultures. Students will participate in a significant service-learning project in this course. Four hours a week.


  • MGT3330C-A Legal Environment of Business
  • Instructor: Augusta G. Dickson | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the general framework of the legal environment in which twenty-first-century business is expected to operate.  The primary objective is to acquaint students with the many practical legal issues they should be cognizant of and are likely to encounter throughout their business careers.  Class discussion will emphasize current court case decisions of the state and federal appellate courts and the United States Supreme Court as appropriate.  Students will appreciate how the law is integrated into the development of strategic business decisions.  Primary course topics will be drawn from the following business law categories:  1. Government Regulation of Business and the Court System 2.  The Law of Contracts, Sales and an Introduction to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) 3. The Law of Torts; Negligence, Strict Liability and Product Liability with some applications to Professional Responsibility  4.  The Law of Agency and Employment 5.  Methods of Business Formation including Proprietorships, Partnerships, Corporations and Special Business Forms.  Prerequisite:  BUS1100 and Sophomore standing or permission.  Four hours a week.


  • MGT3351C-A Human Resource Management 
  • Instructor: Paul Antonellis | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

This is a broad survey course providing a comprehensive overview of several human resource functions, including recruitment and selection, compensation, training, performance evaluation, labor and employee relations. Students will consider HRM topics as they relate to all employees with different roles and perspectives for supervisors and subordinates, and how these topics apply to creating strategic directions for an organization. Using an applied setting focus, instruction methods combine interactive lectures, experiential exercises, current events, case review, and external project analysis and presentation. Prerequisite: BUS 1100. Fulfills X in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • SPM3000C-A Intro to Sport Management
  • Instructor: Taesoo Ahn | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

In this course, students will be introduced to the unique opportunities and operational aspects of a sport management career.  The course will provide introductory exposure to the following areas: the historical evolution of American and international sports; the relationship between the mass media and the sports industry; the economic impact of sports; the interactive relationship between sports and society; and legal and ethical issues in sport management. Prerequisite: BUS 1100. Four hours a week.


  • SPM3005C-A Sports Marketing
  • Instructor: Taesoo Ahn | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

Marketing is a critical function in the sport organization.  Sport marketing exposes students to the dynamics of marketing a sport organization.  Topics include promotion, public relations, event sponsorship, strategic marketing, consumer behavior, and brand management. Prerequisites: BUS 2205.  Four hours a week.

Statistics

  • BUS2213C-A Business Statistics 
  • Instructor: Bruce Han | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Time: T/R 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

Provides an introduction to fundamental statistical principles and procedures. Topics include descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions and sampling distributions, statistical inference and estimation, linear regression and correlation. Prerequisites: BUS 1100 and MTH 1003 (or course equivalent: MTH 1016, 1115, or 1217). Fulfills Q in LS Core. Four hours a week.

Education

Criminology

  • CRM1000C-A Introduction to Criminology
  • Instructor: Alyssa Yetter | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course explores crime, justice, and punishment.  In this course, the causes of crime and the solutions and policies in place to deter or solve crime will be critically examined. We will also examine the social processes whereby crime is defined and detected, and offenders are apprehended and punished. The overall objective of the course is to examine crime and punishment within the context of the society and culture which surrounds it. These topics are connected to inequalities of race, class, and gender, which will be key concerns throughout this course. Coverage of crime and punishment in popular media is also a central focus of this course. Required for majors. Social Science distribution requirement.  Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • CRM2500C-A The Death Penalty
  • Instructor: Alicia Malone | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course is a detailed investigation into the legal, moral, religious, historical, economic, biological, social, and political issues involved in the current administration of the death penalty in America and worldwide.  After first examining the history of capital punishment and the arguments pro and con, the course will consider, among others, the following topics: early challenges to the death penalty; different attempts to enact constitutional death penalty policies; the history of the execution of juveniles, the mentally retarded, the insane and the innocent; the role of the jury in capital cases; the effect of race on capital sentencing; and the procedural requirements for capital sentencing trials.  In addition, some course materials may be tailored to the interests of the particular course members.  SOC1001 or SOC3200 or CRM1000 or consent of instructor. Three hours a week.


  • CRM3600C-A Drugs and Society
  • Instructor: Brittnie Aiello | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course examines the use and control of mind-altering and medicinal substances in the U.S. and abroad. Human beings have used drugs for medicinal, recreational, and cultural purposes since pre-historic times. Almost as long, societies have grappled with how to negotiate the role of drug use in social, political, and economic life. We will examine historical and contemporary drug scares; the juxtaposition of prescription drugs and illegal drugs; the response of the medical and criminal justice systems to drug “problems”; and the relationship between drug use, marginalized populations, crime, and punishment. We will pay particular attention to current issues and debates regarding drugs: the opiate crisis, the legalization debate, harm reduction, cartels, and the fallout from the War on Drugs. Prerequisite(s): CRM 1000 or consent of the instructor. Fulfills: W in LS Core


  • CRM4800C-A Criminal Justice Internship
  • Instructor: Jackie Gillette | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

The Criminology Internship course offers students who major or minor in Criminology experiential learning opportunities. The course provides students with a unique opportunity to experience possible career interests, to learn from those already working in the field, and to establish valuable contacts that may be helpful in acquiring fulltime employment.  Students volunteer at the placement agency 10-15 hours a week, meet periodically with the internship coordinator, and complete written work related to the internship. Students should meet with the internship coordinator in the semester prior to the internship to determine appropriate placement. A memorandum of understanding concerning the responsibilities of the student will be signed by the student, agency and the internship coordinator. Prerequisites: CRM 1000 and consent of the instructor. Required for majors. Fulfills X in LS Core.

Education

 

  • EDU3300C-A Administration of Early Childhood Programs
  • Instructor: Pat Howson | 2 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course prepares prospective directors to administer and manage a childcare center or out-of school program. Content provides a foundation in organizational management to guide the instructional practices of teachers and support staff and establish systems for program functioning. Students will understand the director’s leadership responsibilities, professionalism, and the role of personal awareness and reflection. Topics include state requirements and compliance standards for licensing, QRIS and NAEYC standards, legal and fiscal management, staffing of programs, personnel selection, training and supervision staff, program operations and facilities management, and family and community connections.

Health Sciences

Health Sciences

  • HSC1122C-A Anatomy and Physiology I
  • Instructor: Desiree Jubinville | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: T/W/R 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. This course will focus on the basic principles of cells and tissues, and the integumentary, musculoskeletal, central and peripheral nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide the opportunity for the student to understand, acquire and develop the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Three hours of lecture plus one laboratory period a week.


  • HSC1123C-A Anatomy and Physiology II
  • Instructor: Zachary Zdrada | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: T/R 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM and W 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM

This course continues the human anatomy and physiology topics and includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide an opportunity for the student to further develop and apply the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body. Prerequisite: HSC1122. Three hours of lecture plus one laboratory period a week.


  • HSC2300C-A Nutrition, Diet & Health
  • Instructor: Michael Corcoran | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • HSC2300C-B Nutrition, Diet & Health
  • Instructor: Michael Corcoran | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • HSC2300C-C Nutrition, Diet & Health
  • Instructor: Leena Bharath | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • HSC2350C-A Professional Development in Health Sciences
  • Instructor: Samantha McGurgan | 2 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

To provide the Merrimack College sophomore with a continuum of self and career exploration education in preparation for an internship or research experience. This professional development in health sciences course sets a foundation for building solid life and career decision-making skills through a series of exploratory exercises, as well as professionally prepares students for their upcoming internship or research experience.


  • HSC3103C-A Global Public Health
  • Instructor: Matthew Lovett | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Global public health is a study of the biological, socioeconomic and environmental contributors to health and disease in populations around the world. Students will investigate the determinants of health, how health status is measured, and will review the burden of disease, risk factors and approaches to global cooperation to address health problems within and between nations for successful interventions. Specific issues underlying strategies and organization for health care delivery and health services will be discussed and linked to community service projects that aim to develop social responsibility through civic engagement and humanitarian activities. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Four hours a week.


  • HSC3302C-A Intro to Public Health
  • Instructor: Jason Aziz | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Public health aims to understand the occurrence and causes of disease within populations with the goal of prevention and health promotion, through changes in individual behavior, control of infectious disease and environmental health factors, and social and political organization for health improvement. The aim will be to describe the patterns of selected diseases in populations, to explain the causation of disease at the cell/physiological to social levels, to predict disease occurrence and to control disease through prevention strategies aimed at individuals, communities and governments. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement and X in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • HSC3310C-A Health Behavior and Promotion
  • Instructor: Sarah Benes | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course focuses on health behavior theories and strategies to promote individuals’ healthy lifestyle. The major theories that will be covered in this course include Health Belief Model, Social Ecological Theory, Expectancy Value Models and Stage Models. Emphases are placed on improving students’ competency in understanding of health behaviors in the modern world, design of theory-based interventions to improve health behaviors for assisting others in health promotion. 3 credit hours are devoted to didactic lecture; 1 credit hour is devoted to activity-based experiential learning (i.e., students analyze health behaviors for different individuals by meeting with them once a week and record their interview in folios). Pre-requisite: HSC3302.


  • HSC4850WC-A Health Science Internship I
  • Instructor: Jacquelyn MacDonald | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Week: N/A

A work-study experience co-supervised by the Internship Coordinator and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, community, or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the health care field. Students who volunteer for internship in clinical, academic, and community settings provide a public service to the facility or program. Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of the department.


  • SME1104C-A Introduction to Physical Activity, Fitness, and Wellness
  • Instructor: Kevin Eugene Finn | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course is a survey of the discipline of health and fitness, including knowledge derived from performing physical activity, studying about physical activity, and professional practice centered in physical activity. It includes an analysis of the importance of health and wellness in daily life, the relationship between physical activity and the discipline of kinesiology, and the general effects of physical activity experiences. The course surveys the general knowledge base of the Health Science discipline as reflected in the major sub disciplines and reviews selected concepts in each, showing how they contribute to our understanding of the nature and importance of physical activity. The students will learn about the fitness components of wellness; flexibility, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, nutrition, weight management, and cancer. Fitness and other positive lifestyle habits that lead to better health, improved quality of life, and total well-being will be discussed. Students will be responsible for developing a self-paced fitness program that will be followed for the duration of the semester.  In addition, the course introduces students to the general  and specific characteristics of the health and wellness professions. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • SME1104C-B Introduction to Physical Activity, Fitness, and Wellness
  • Instructor: Leah K. Poloskey | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course is a survey of the discipline of health and fitness, including knowledge derived from performing physical activity, studying about physical activity, and professional practice centered in physical activity. It includes an analysis of the importance of health and wellness in daily life, the relationship between physical activity and the discipline of kinesiology, and the general effects of physical activity experiences. The course surveys the general knowledge base of the Health Science discipline as reflected in the major sub disciplines and reviews selected concepts in each, showing how they contribute to our understanding of the nature and importance of physical activity. The students will learn about the fitness components of wellness; flexibility, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, nutrition, weight management, and cancer. Fitness and other positive lifestyle habits that lead to better health, improved quality of life, and total well-being will be discussed. Students will be responsible for developing a self-paced fitness program that will be followed for the duration of the semester.  In addition, the course introduces students to the general  and specific characteristics of the health and wellness professions. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.

Liberal Arts

Communications

  • COM1020-A Public Communication 
  • Instructor: Brian Zager | 4 Credits | Hybrid
  • Days/Week: T 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course focuses on the concepts and practices associated with effective public communication. A central aspect of this course entails the mastering of public speaking through the process of researching, preparing, and delivering presentations in a variety of formats (e.g., informative, persuasive, and impromptu). The classroom serves as a laboratory to develop the skills needed for effective public communication. In addition, students will also analyze public speaking events as a means of developing a critical understanding of the public communication process.


  • COM2010C-A Research Inquiry
  • Instructor: Lisa Perks | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course is offered to help students examine both quantitative and qualitative methodologies utilized by researchers in Communication. Students will be introduced to the concepts of research design, sampling, measurement, data collection, behavioral observation, statistical analysis and ethics. The difference between implications of humanistic/interpretive research and positivistic/objective research will be emphasized. Prerequisite: COM 1020 and COM 2201 or COM 2301 or COM 2401, or consent of the instructor. Four hours a week.


  • COM2401C-A Introduction to Media
  • Instructor: Melissa Zimdars | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course focuses on the basic principles of mass communication and its historical development. Issues explored include media access, media ethics, media effects, and current trends in the growth of digital and wireless mass communication technologies. Students examine the role of the media industry in reinforcing and challenging dominant values, attitudes, and beliefs central to American culture. An additional feature of the course studies how mass media-created ideals have been disseminated internationally, as well as how media businesses reflect, influence and sometimes defy societal norms. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own independent mass media project. No prerequisite. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • COM3350WC-A Media Industries and Organizations
  • Instructor: Melissa Zimdars | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course offers an in-depth exploration of media industries and organizations, specifically focusing on multinational media conglomerates with consideration of mid-sized and independent producers of media. We will examine everything from organizational structures and functions to why decisions are made and the implications of those decisions on the kinds of media texts that are produced and consumed. By using a critical media industry studies perspective, this course will also consider issues of industry lore and history, national contexts, globalization, political economy, and individual agency. The first ten weeks of the semester will be devoted to these broad topics, while the last five weeks of the semester focus on current media industry trends. Satisfies W requirement in LS Core.


  • COM4851C-A Communication Studies Internship
  • Instructor: Andrew Tollison | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course is a work-study experience co-supervised by the Communication Arts and Sciences Department and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, communication or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the communication discipline. Students must work in the field at least an average of 15 hours per week for eight weeks, totaling 120 hours. In addition, students will work individually through email with the Internship Director to produce a 10-15 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience. Prerequisite: COM 2010 and permission of instructor. Fulfills X in LS Core.

Economics

  • ECO1203C-A Principles of Microeconomics
  • Instructor: Svetlana Smirnov | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

(Formerly EC201A)An introduction to economics that stresses the value of knowledge of the market and its alternatives in understanding current issues of social and public policy. Focuses on how and why markets work; why they may fail; and how the implications of success or failure for social policy in such things as the control of industry, poverty, consumer choice, and the environment. Satisfies the social science distribution requirement.


  • ECO1204C-A Principles of Macroeconomics
  • Instructor: Svetlana Smirnov | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

(Formerly EC202A)An introduction to economics. Examines measurements of the economy’s performance, the broad economic forces determining the level of unemployment, the rate of inflation and economic growth, and government fiscal and monetary policy. Satisfies the social science distribution requirement.

English

  • ENG1550C-A Major American Authors
  • Instructor: Christy Pottroff | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

One-semester course designed to introduce students to American literature through the study of writers representing a range of cultures and literary traditions. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • ENG2050C-A Introduction to Literary Studies
  • Instructor: Joseph Vogel | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course introduces students to such traditional literary genres as fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as newer and emerging forms such as the graphic novel, creative non-fiction, digital storytelling, and film. Emphasis is given to teaching students to read closely and to write analytically. The course also familiarizes students with a variety of interpretive strategies. Students leave the course recognizing the value of close reading and self-conscious interpretation. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • ENG2150C-A Introduction to Creative Writing
  • Instructor: Emily Duffy-Camparone | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Introduces the main genres of creative writing, including poetry, memoir, and fiction. In addition to producing their own creative forms such as poems, song lyrics, literary memoir, and short stories, students will study the works of contemporary and canonical authors in each genre. Classwork includes the workshopping of both short and longer projects and will culminate in a portfolio of revised work. Fulfills an AL requirement in LS Core.


  • ENG2770C-A Literature and Film
  • Instructor: Joseph Vogel | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Study of the transformation of works of literature into film, focusing on the different techniques used in cinema, literature, and the relationship of film to traditional literature. Class will focus on four major films and the literature they are based on. Prerequisite: ENG/WRT1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

Fine Arts

  • FAA1310C-A The Nature of Music: The Art of Listening
  • Instructor: Paula Bishop | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

A course designed to introduce students to the art of active listening to music. A multiplicity of musical styles and genres are employed in the course as means toward the ultimate goal of developing deeper, more aware listening habits in students’ daily life. The course will include exploration of western classical genres, including opera and the symphony; popular styles like jazz and rock; and folk musics of the world, including the Americas. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • FAA1320C-A History of Rock and Roll
  • Instructor: Christopher Gagne | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • FAA1320C-B History of Rock and Roll
  • Instructor: TBD | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core. Three hours a week.

First Year Writing

  • FYW1050C-A First Year Writing
  • Instructor: Brenda Hajec | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course examines the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the interaction of writer, audience, language, purpose, and situation. Fosters an understanding of the ways in which writing, thinking, and learning are related. Sections limited to 15 students each. Intensive concentration during the semester on the student’s own writing examined in class and in conference with the instructor. Either WRT1050 or ENG1050 or FYW1050 satisfy the Institutional requirement in first year writing and fulfills FYW in LS Core. Cannot be taken in addition to ENG1050 or WRT1050. Does not count toward English major or minor. Three hours a week.


  • FYW1050C-B First Year Writing
  • Instructor: Brenda Hajec | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course examines the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the interaction of writer, audience, language, purpose, and situation. Fosters an understanding of the ways in which writing, thinking, and learning are related. Sections limited to 15 students each. Intensive concentration during the semester on the student’s own writing examined in class and in conference with the instructor. Either WRT1050 or ENG1050 or FYW1050 satisfy the Institutional requirement in first year writing and fulfills FYW in LS Core. Cannot be taken in addition to ENG1050 or WRT1050. Does not count toward English major or minor. Three hours a week.

History

  • FAA1320C-A History of Rock and Roll
  • Instructor: Christopher Gagne | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • FAA1320C-B History of Rock and Roll
  • Instructor: TBD | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • WGS3300C-A US Women’s History
  • Instructor: Katina Manko-Mitchell | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

An examination of the history of women in America. It will include history prior to colonization, beyond and to the present. A look at women’s roles in US Society and the intersection of class, culture and ethnicity in shaping women’s historical experiences across time. The course will examine the transformations and continuities in women’s lives as well as the political, social, economic and cultural factors that inspired, infused or inhibited women’s changing roles. This class also explores the ways in which race, class and ethnicity have operated to unite and divide disparate groups of women. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • WGS3300C-B US Women’s History
  • Instructor: Katina Manko-Mitchell | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

An examination of the history of women in America. It will include history prior to colonization, beyond and to the present. A look at women’s roles in US Society and the intersection of class, culture and ethnicity in shaping women’s historical experiences across time. The course will examine the transformations and continuities in women’s lives as well as the political, social, economic and cultural factors that inspired, infused or inhibited women’s changing roles. This class also explores the ways in which race, class and ethnicity have operated to unite and divide disparate groups of women. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • HIS1106C-A  U.S. History: From Pre-Contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Instructor: Walker Robins | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Time: T/R 9:30am-12:40pm
  • Summer II
  • 7/8/2019 - 8/16/2019
  • Register Now

This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.
Fulfills: H in LS Core


  • HIS1119C-A  The European Experience: Antiquity to the Reformation
  • Instructor: Stephen Russell | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Time: T/R 6:00pm-9:10pm
  • Summer II
  • 7/8/2019 - 8/16/2019
  • Register Now

This course examines the major events and developments in European history from ancient civilizations through the Renaissance and Reformation, with particular emphasis upon the political context, the causes and implications of social and economic change, and cultural evolution. This course is not open to History Majors who have received credit for HIS 1130.
Fulfills: H in LS Core

Italian

  • ITA1110C-A Introductory Italian I
  • Instructor: Cinzia DiGiulio | 4 Credits
  • Days/Week: T/W/R 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course is offered for absolute beginners only. This course is not open to heritage speakers or students with any prior study of Italian. Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language. Prerequisite: no Italian classes on High School Transcript. Fulfills FL in LS Core. Three hours a week plus films and other cultural activities outside the classroom.

Philosophy

  • PHL1000C-A Introduction to Philosophy
  • Instructor: Christopher Brooks | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor. Fulfills PHL in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PHL1000C-B Introduction to Philosophy
  • Instructor: Paul D’Ambrosio | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor. Fulfills PHL in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PHL2020WC-A Perspectives on the Good Life
  • Instructor: Art Ledoux | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Before it comes to an end, how shall I spend the life I have? What would make that life genuinely worth living? We will seek the guidance of many masters: East and West, ancient and modern, women and men and from diverse races. We have much to consider, but the main challenge for each of us is to shape a perspective we can each embrace as our own. What could be more important? Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfill E and W in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PHL2070C-A Environmental Ethics
  • Instructor: Peter Ellard | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Environmental Ethics concerns humanity’s relationship with nature. In addition to questions about our moral obligations to other humans, animals, plants, ecosystems, and future generations, the course will also look at recent work on the Land Ethic, Ecofascism, Deep Ecology, Global Ecocentrism, Ecofeminism, Social Ecology, and Sustainability. We will begin with a brief look at some background texts before turning to philosophical analysis of such contemporary issues as climate change, renewable energy, pollution, and sustainability.
Prerequisite(s): PHL1000.
Fulfills: E in LS Core


  • PHL2090WC-A Values in Technological Culture
  • Instructor: Jim Ruddy | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

A critical examination of the way in which technological innovation has shaped our modern culture. Students will study major ethical traditions, pursue individual research projects on particular areas of technology, suggest solutions to ethical problems that arise there, and report their conclusions. Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000. Fulfills: E in LS Core.


  • PHL2100WC-A Women, Ethics, & Society
  • Instructor: Sara Kallock | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

What is feminism? What are the different forms of oppression? This topic-driven course explores the moral dilemmas that result from living in a patriarchal society. Students will read leading feminist scholarship on topics related to sexism, such as body image, sexuality and violence, and media representations of oppressed groups. Students will have the opportunity to determine where they stand on controversial issues by participating in class discussions. Prerequisite: PHL 1000. Satisfies a second institutional requirement in Philosophy if needed or a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills E, D and W in LS Core.

Political Science

  • POL1100C-A Politics of the US
  • Instructor: Mary McHugh | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

An introduction to the American political system, this course examines (1) the Constitutional basis of American politics, (2) the national institutions that are involved in decision-making and public debate (for example, the Presidency and the bureaucracy, the Federal Courts, the Congress, political parties, the media), (3) issues that Americans argue about (rights and liberties, economic benefits, foreign policy), and the processes by which those arguments are conducted and resolved (campaigns and elections, administrative action, legislation, lobbying, publicity). Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and X in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • POL1500C-A Comparative Politics
  • Instructor: Harry Wessel | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course examines a variety of important issues, such as why are some countries democratic while others are not, what is a state and how did states come about, what is colonialism and how did it shape the present and future of billions of people? The course addresses these questions through an introduction to the study of comparative politics - the art and science of comparing political systems in order to raise and evaluate claims about politics. The substantive material draws on developed and developing parts of the world and covers contemporary as well as recent historical events Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC & D requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


 

  • POL3140C-A Mass Media and American Politics
  • Instructor: Harry Wessel | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course examines of the role of the media in shaping political opinions and behavior. The role of the media in setting political agendas and reporting and interpreting political events will be examined. The nature and influence of public opinion in a democratic society will be studied. Sophomore or above standing. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • POL3560C-A Unarmed Civilian Protection
  • Instructor: TBD | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Unarmed Civilian Protection (UCP) is the practice of civilians protecting civilians in situations of violent conflict, imminent violence, and post-crisis situations. It involves expatriate civilians protecting national civilians, national civilians protecting each other, and even national civilians protecting expatriate civilians. The practice of UCP is nonviolent and nonpartisan. Protection is provided on invitation from local actors. It supports local actors as they work to address the roots and consequences of violent conflict. This practice is grounded in international law, in the principle of civilian immunity in war, and in the protection afforded by international conventions. This course aims to make a contribution to the common objectives of protecting civilians and keeping peace. More specifically, this course provides an introduction to the foundations of UCP, its principles, methods and required skills, as well as offers an overview of UCP in practice. Permission of the chair of the Department of Political Science is required.


  • POL3560C-B Unarmed Civilian Protection
  • Instructor: TBD | 6 Continuing Education Units | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Unarmed Civilian Protection (UCP) is the practice of civilians protecting civilians in situations of violent conflict, imminent violence, and post-crisis situations. It involves expatriate civilians protecting national civilians, national civilians protecting each other, and even national civilians protecting expatriate civilians. The practice of UCP is nonviolent and nonpartisan. Protection is provided on invitation from local actors. It supports local actors as they work to address the roots and consequences of violent conflict. This practice is grounded in international law, in the principle of civilian immunity in war, and in the protection afforded by international conventions. This course aims to make a contribution to the common objectives of protecting civilians and keeping peace. More specifically, this course provides an introduction to the foundations of UCP, its principles, methods and required skills, as well as offers an overview of UCP in practice. Permission of the chair of the Department of Political Science is required.


Psychology

  • PSY1000C-A Introduction to Psychology
  • Instructor: Michael Stroud | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Provides a general overview of the wide-ranging field of psychology. Students will explore major concepts and issues in the study of human thinking, feeling, and acting. These include biological foundations of behavior and experience, how people learn and develop, how individuals perceive the world, individual differences in behavior, social influence and social relations, the difference between normative and non-normative behavior, and approaches to therapy. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS core. Three hours a week.


  • PSY1000C-B Introduction to Psychology
  • Instructor: Amy Clinard | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Provides a general overview of the wide-ranging field of psychology. Students will explore major concepts and issues in the study of human thinking, feeling, and acting. These include biological foundations of behavior and experience, how people learn and develop, how individuals perceive the world, individual differences in behavior, social influence and social relations, the difference between normative and non-normative behavior, and approaches to therapy. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS core. Three hours a week.


  • PSY2280C-A Organizational Psychology
  • Instructor: Dawn Sime | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Application of psychological principles to the world of work. Emphasizes the organization as a complex social system. Applied topics include the selection, training, and evaluation of personnel. Theoretical issues include motivation, leadership, group dynamics, and organizational structure. Prerequisite: PSY1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PSY2300C-A Developmental Psychology
  • Instructor: Aleksandra Plocha | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Introduction to theory and research related to the development of psychological processes from infancy to adulthood. Analyzes the concept of development, the nature-nurture issue and the epigenetic nature of human development. Also examines cognitive, social, and personality development in their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: PSY 1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PSY2400C-A Personality
  • Instructor: Dawn Sime | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Introduces classical and contemporary thinking on the concept of ‘personality’. Explores the contributions of several important theoretical frameworks in personality theory including psychoanalysis, phenomenology, trait theory, and learning. Prerequisite: PSY 1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PSY2470C-A The Psychology of Trauma
  • Instructor: Aleksandra Plocha | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Explores the psychology of trauma and human resilience. This course explores the range of posttraumatic reactions to a variety of situations as they affect cognitive, emotional, somatic and interpersonal aspects of functioning. Students will be exposed to an overview of the etiology of and prevailing theories about PTSD. Factors contributing to the resilience to trauma as well as societal, cultural, and historical influences on views of trauma will also be discussed. Pre-requisite: PSY1000, Introduction to Psychology.


  • PSY3250C-A Cultural Psychology
  • Instructor: Rob Koegel | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Analyzes current theories and research on culture, race and ethnicity; and explores the ways in which the individual, social relations and culture mutually constitute each other. The course analyzes the rich interconnections between language and culture, and the role of culture in the construction of self and higher-order psychological processes. Students will examine cultural groups within and outside of the United States. Also includes consideration of cultural issues in the interpretation of personal experience and the role of cultural diversity in contemporary society. Prerequisite: PSY 1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • PSY3410C-A Abnormal Psychology
  • Instructor: Gwyne White | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Examination of basic issues in psychopathology. Focus on description, etiology and treatment of neurosis, character disorder, and psychosis from varying theoretical and clinical perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY1000. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.

Religious and Theological Studies

  • RTS1100C-A Christianity in Context
  • Instructor: Nick DiSalvatore | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

As an introduction to Christianity, this course will investigate a number of the “contexts” in which it began, in which it developed, and in which we find it today. Students will study Christianity in the historical contexts within the ancient world and of ancient Judaism, in the literary contexts of the Christian Bible and its interpretation, in the intellectual context of church history, and in contemporary global contexts. In keeping with the College’s Augustinian identity, mission, and vision, this course will also highlight the contributions of St. Augustine. Satisfies the first institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. Fulfills RTS in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • RTS1100C-B Christianity in Context
  • Instructor: Nick DiSalvatore | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

As an introduction to Christianity, this course will investigate a number of the “contexts” in which it began, in which it developed, and in which we find it today. Students will study Christianity in the historical contexts within the ancient world and of ancient Judaism, in the literary contexts of the Christian Bible and its interpretation, in the intellectual context of church history, and in contemporary global contexts. In keeping with the College’s Augustinian identity, mission, and vision, this course will also highlight the contributions of St. Augustine. Satisfies the first institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. Fulfills RTS in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • RTS3210-A Gender and the Bible
  • Instructor: Anna Choi | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

The course investigates the Bible as a “gendered” text of Christian and Jewish religious history and practice. It introduces students to the pertinent gender theories, primary texts, and scholarly discussions. The course also helps students to develop an understanding about the lasting influences of the Bible on past and present formations of gender as practiced in Western culture, politics, and religion.
Fulfills: Second institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. D in LS Core.

Sociology

  • SOC1600C-A Happiness
  • Instructor: Rob Koegel | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This interdisciplinary course will analyze the key sources of and debates about happiness. As we explore possibilities of increasing happiness, individually and collectively, we will focus on the relationship between happiness and success, culture, motivation, social media, food, and exercise. This course is based on the assumption that learning, at its best, open minds, changes lives, and is fun. Instead of analyzing abstract ideas that are often hard to relate to, we will constantly connect the issues we explore to your questions, beliefs, and dreams.


 

  • SOC3450C-A Sociology of the Family
  • Instructor: Michelle Holliday-Stocking | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

This course provides an overview of the family as a major institution of society using a sociological perspective. The family is studied from both the macro and micro levels with special attention devoted to the significant transformations and changes the family is undergoing in its form and functions. The changing nature of the family is discussed in terms of its effects on us individually as well as the impact the changes are making in society.

The objectives of this course are: (1) to introduce students to the essential concepts, theories, and research used in sociology to analyze the family; (2) to enhance the students’ understanding of the complexity of family life and how family experience is shaped by race, social class, gender, and culture; (3) to enable students to identify and examine sociologically relevant problems and issues within the contemporary family; and (4) to encourage critical thinking and writing skills that demonstrate the students’ abilities to understand and analyze social phenomena. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or consent of the instructor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • SOC3600C-A Sociology of Health
  • Instructor: Michelle Holliday-Stocking | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A

Health, illness and healing are not merely physiological states but also human experiences shaped by sociological forces. As Freund, McGuire and Podhurst point out in Health, Illness and the Social Body. A Critical Sociology [2003: 4], “The sick body is not simply a closed container, encased in skin that has been invaded by germs or traumatic blows but is also open and connected to the world that surrounds it. Thus the human body is open to the social body. Similarly, our material (or physical) environment, such as the urban landscape, the workplace, or our foods, is influenced by our culture, social structure, and relationships. And these in turn influence our bodies.” The course begins with a brief review of the history of past viewpoints and practices in western civilization toward health, healing and illness leading to the emergence of the modern medical profession, scientific medicine, and the establishment of the medical model as the primary paradigm of disease. We will examine the social factors that influence who gets sick, the types of illness suffered, the experience of being sick, the process of seeking help, and the context in which medical care is delivered. We will discuss the effect of stress on health and the role that human relationships and social support play in mediating stress. We will assess the state of our health care system and compare it to other systems. In general, we will depend on the theories, concepts and findings from sociology as they apply in the study of this area to direct our focus and inform our analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 1001 or consent of the instructor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.

Spanish

  • SPA1110C-A Introductory Spanish I
  • Instructor: Wanda Ocasio-Rivera | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: T/W/R 6:00PM - 9:50 PM

This course is offered for absolute beginners only. This course is not open to heritage speakers or students with any prior study of Spanish. Oral-aural Proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including mandatory language lab. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language. Prerequisite: no Spanish classes on High School Transcript. Fulfills FL in LS Core. Three hours a week and interactive aural/oral audio visual activities outside the classroom.

 


  • SPA2010C-A Intermediate Spanish I
  • Instructor: Wanda Ocasio-Rivera | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: T/W/R 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course is not open to heritage speakers. This is an intermediate level course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from Hispanic literature and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance. Most instruction conducted in the target language. Prerequisite: placed at this level by Placement Test or SPA 1120 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. The intermediate language sequence (2010, 2020) satisfies BOTH Humanities distribution requirements. Fulfills FL in LS Core. Three hours a week and interactive aural/oral audio visual activities outside the classroom.

Women’s and Gender Studies

 

  • WGS1010C-B Gender and Society
  • Instructor: MaryBeth Salerno | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

This course will explore current attitudes about women, men and differently gendered persons in Western society, approaching women’s, men’s and differently gendered person’s experiences through insights provided by feminist thought on such areas as race and ethnicity, work, education, media, family, gender, sexuality, religion, and politics. Among the questions the course will consider are: Why is it important to study how gender is constructed? Why have women been treated differently than men in society? What is patriarchy? And how is power distributed based on gender? Required for the Women’s and Gender Studies Contract Major and Minor. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • WGS3300C-A US Women’s History
  • Instructor: Katina Manko-Mitchell | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

An examination of the history of women in America. It will include history prior to colonization, beyond and to the present. A look at women’s roles in US Society and the intersection of class, culture and ethnicity in shaping women’s historical experiences across time. The course will examine the transformations and continuities in women’s lives as well as the political, social, economic and cultural factors that inspired, infused or inhibited women’s changing roles. This class also explores the ways in which race, class and ethnicity have operated to unite and divide disparate groups of women. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • WGS3300C-B US Women’s History
  • Instructor: Katina Manko-Mitchell | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

An examination of the history of women in America. It will include history prior to colonization, beyond and to the present. A look at women’s roles in US Society and the intersection of class, culture and ethnicity in shaping women’s historical experiences across time. The course will examine the transformations and continuities in women’s lives as well as the political, social, economic and cultural factors that inspired, infused or inhibited women’s changing roles. This class also explores the ways in which race, class and ethnicity have operated to unite and divide disparate groups of women. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.


  • WGS3420C-A Gender, Race, and Media
  • Instructor: Simona Sharoni | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Time: N/A

In this hands-on course we will examine theories of gender, race, class, ethnicity and sexuality in mainstream and independent media. We will study who controls the media, whose story is told, and from what perspective. A focus will be on the historical and current impact racial and gender stereotypes in the media have on individuals and communities. We will examine how oppressed groups worldwide are portrayed in mainstream media and how they are using the media to tell their own stories. We will learn how various audiences interpret the media differently. Throughout the course we will address issues of social inequality in the media and forms of resistance and explore alternative media, global media, media literacy and media democracy. Finally, students will put theory into practice and create group videos. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.

World Languages and Cultural Studies

  • WLC1000C-A International Customs, Cultures & Languages
  • Instructor: Joel Dure | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: Thursday 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This course explores the culture (or cultures) of a non-English-speaking country. The course aims to stimulate cultural curiosity and cross-cultural communication, along with providing practical knowledge of the customs and culture(s) of the specific country that will be covered each semester. The aspects of the country’s culture that will be covered include Culture and Arts, Social values, Food and other customs, Economics, Geography, History, Politics, Demographics and other social issues such as immigration/emigration, the environment, and mass media. There will also be a language component at the introductory level to provide students with the tools to navigate the target culture. This course is available exclusively for Degree Completion students who are taking courses through the Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies. Fulfills FL in LS Core for GPS students.

Science and Engineering

Biology

 

  • BIO1028C-A Principles of Biology II
  • Instructor: R. David MacLaren | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/T/W/R 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM

The Unity and Diversity of Life: Organisms, Ecology and Evolution. An introduction to biological principles centered on organisms, adaptation and evolution. The course will focus on the process of evolution and the diversity of higher organisms. The course will explore how and why all living organisms must deal with the transmission of information, with the capture and expenditure of energy, with transport of materials, and with self-regulation. Animal behavior will also be considered. The course will have an integrated lecture and laboratory and will stress the relationships between organismal adaptation, form, function, ecological relationships and evolution.

Prerequisites BIO 1027 or consent of instructor. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Three hours lecture and one laboratory period a week.

Chemistry

 

  • CHM1110C-B General Chemistry I
  • Instructor: Stephen Theberge | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/T/W/R 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This chemistry course is for science majors. Topics include the composition of matter, the mole, stoichiometry, atomic structure, molecular bonding and structure, and the solid and liquid states. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: one year of High School Chemistry and MTH 1000 or placing out of MTH 1000 on the math placement test. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Offered every fall semester. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory a week.


  • CHM1120C-A General Chemistry II
  • Instructor: TBD | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/T/W/R 6:00 PM - 9:50 PM

This chemistry courses is for science majors. A continuation of CHM 1110. Topics include aqueous solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium calculations, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: CHM 1110. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Offered every spring semester. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory a week.


  • CHM2210C-A Organic Chemistry I
  • Instructor: Patrick Gordon | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: T/R 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon. The concepts of bonding, structure, and classification of compounds by functional groups, as well as reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers are presented from a mechanistic viewpoint. Stereochemical principles are emphasized. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are introduced. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHM 1120. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core. Offered every semester. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory a week.


  • CHM2220C-A Organic Chemistry II
  • Instructor: Patrick Gordon | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: T/R 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

A continuation of CHM 2210. The chemistry of aromatic compounds is introduced, and strong emphasis is given to the chemistry of organic compounds containing the carbonyl and amine functional groups. The application of organic reactions in multistep synthesis and the biological applications are emphasized. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is introduced. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHM 2210. Offered every semester. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory a week.

Mathematics

 


  • MTH1016C-A Pre-Calculus
  • Instructor: Steve Smith | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/W 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
  • Summer III - 8 week course
  • 5/20/2019 - 7/18/2019
  • Register Now

This course develops students’ mathematical problem-solving skills and prepares students for courses in calculus and science. Emphasis is on the creation and use of functions and graphs to explain the relationship between quantities in applied problems. Types of functions investigated include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and their inverses. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Fulfills Q in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • MTH1111C-A Basic Statistics
  • Instructor: Jack Driscoll | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A
  • Summer I - 8 week course 
  • 5/13/2019 - 7/2/2019
  • Register Now

Basic methods of statistical inference including the organization and analysis of data, sampling theory, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance. MTH 1111 is not open to students with credit for MTH 2527, MTH 1505, BUS 2213, BE 213, or ST 211. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • MTH1111C-B Basic Statistics
  • Instructor: Jack Driscoll | 4 Credits | Online
  • Days/Week: N/A
  • Summer II - 8 week course
  • 7/8/2019 - 8/30/2019
  • Register Now

Basic methods of statistical inference including the organization and analysis of data, sampling theory, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance. MTH 1111 is not open to students with credit for MTH 2527, MTH 1505, BUS 2213, BE 213, or ST 211. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • MTH1217C-A Calculus I
  • Instructor: Kathy Runge | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/W 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
  • Summer I - 8 week course
  • 5/20/2019 - 7/18/2019
  • Register Now

A first course in calculus for functions of a single variable. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and applications of differentiation, including related rates, optimization, and the evaluation of indeterminate forms will be covered. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Prerequisite: MTH 1016 or exemption from MTH 1016 through the Mathematics Placement exam. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • MTH1218C-A Calculus II
  • Instructor: Darryl Key | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/W 5:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Summer III - 8 week course
  • 5/20/2019 - 7/18/2019
  • Register Now

A continuation of MTH 1217 for functions of a single variable. Includes techniques and applications of integration, sequences, and series, including Taylor series. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Prerequisite: MTH 1217. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core. Four hours a week.


  • MTH2219C-A Calculus III
  • Instructor: Abdellah Dakhama | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/W 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
  • Summer III - 8 week course
  • 5/20/2019 - 7/18/2019
  • Register Now

Functions in parametric form and the calculus of these functions, including polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Vectors in two and three dimensional space and the calculus of vector-valued functions. Lines, planes, and surfaces in three dimensional space. The calculus of functions of several variables: limits, partial and directional derivatives, gradient, tangent planes and normal lines, relative maxima and minima, double and triple integrals in rectangular and polar form. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Computer algebra software may also be required. Prerequisite: MTH 1218. Four hours a week.


  • MTH2220C-A Differential Equations
  • Instructor: Mike Bradley | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/T/W/R 9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

An introduction to ordinary differential equations and their use in science and engineering. Topics include first order separable, linear, homogeneous and exact equations; higher order linear equations and first order linear systems; elementary numerical methods; and an introduction to planar dynamical systems and their local phase portraits at critical points. An emphasis is placed on linear equations and systems and their solution using techniques such as eigenvalues, variation of parameters, Laplace transform, and power series. Prerequisite: MTH 2219 or consent of the instructor. Four hours a week.

Physics

  • PHY2201C-A General Physics I (with laboratory)
  • Instructor: Douglas White | 4 Credits | Traditional
  • Days/Week: M/T/W/R 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

First semester of a one-year introduction to physics, without calculus. Topics normally include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, torque, statics, and circular and rotational motion.
Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000 or equivalent.
Corequisite(s): PHY2001L (concurrent enrollment)
Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.