Fall Semester 2020

Courses run from August 31 until December 18 unless noted otherwise.  

All Merrimack College students should register through myMack.

See tuition and fees | Email us with your questions.

Courses Offered

Accounting

  • ACC4406C-A Advanced Accounting
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA2
This course examines and analyzes complex accounting topics not previously covered in Intermediate Accounting. Topics covered include: Intercorporate acquisitions and consolidated financial statements; foreign currency transactions, segment and SEC reporting; accounting for non-for-profit organizations; governmental accounting; and other topics current in the field of accounting. Prerequisite(s): ACC 3303.
  • ACC3308C-A Cost Accounting
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA1
An examination of the manufacturing function from the view of the cost accountant. Managerial control of the elements of product costs will be studied with an emphasis on cost accumulation systems, both historical and estimated. Topics covered will include standard (estimated) costs, variance analysis, profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, and relevant cost analysis for problem solving.Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203 and MTH 1003 (or course equivalent: MTH 1002 MTH 1016, MTH 1115, or MTH 1217).An examination of the manufacturing function from the view of the cost accountant. Managerial control of the elements of product costs will be studied with an emphasis on cost accumulation systems, both historical and estimated. Topics covered will include standard (estimated) costs, variance analysis, profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, and relevant cost analysis for problem solving.Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203 and MTH 1003 (or course equivalent: MTH 1002 MTH 1016, MTH 1115, or MTH 1217).

Business

  • BUS1100C-A Introduction to Business
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA1
Primarily for freshmen, the course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the functional areas of business while emphasizing oral and written communication and effective group interaction. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of business through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technological applications, and outside activities.
  • BUS2210C-A Management Information Systems
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA2
Management Information Systems presents a core of IS principles with which every business student should be familiar. Information technology has become a key component in accomplishing strategic and operational goals in organizations today. It is necessary to understand how a company utilizes information technology to gain its competitive advantage in business. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental concepts and principles of information systems. Therefore, it focuses on breadth of coverage rather than the depth of any specific IS area. Topics include: the role of IT in organizations, computers and information processing, hardware and software, managing data resources, telecommunications and networks, electronic commerce, security, IS ethics and leading information technologies and applications.Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100.
  • BUS2220C-A Operations Management
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA2
The course is designed to provide students majoring in business administration with an overview of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of operations management (OM). The focus of operations in the process of converting or transforming resources into products and services. The principal responsibilities of operations managers lie in making sound, cost-effective decisions that increase the productivity and competitiveness of both manufacturing and service organizations. The process of planning, implementing and monitoring the production allows operations managers to continuously improve in providing high quality goods and services at low costs thereby adding more value for the customer. Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100, BUS 2203 & BUS 2213.

Management

  • MGT3355C-A Diversity in the Workplace
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA2
This course, which may include a service learning component, explores the workplace dynamics related to people’s similarities and differences in characteristics such as race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and physical and mental ability. Topics include perception and attribution, the social construction of identity, privilege, power relations, discrimination, prejudice, stereotypes, and approaches businesses and other organizations take to address issues of workplace diversity.Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 and at least Sophomore standing. Fulfills: D in LS Core
  • MGT3310C-A Organizational Behavior
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA1
This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed through the Business Enterprise core courses. The course will focus on individual and group level organizational behavior within domestic and international contexts, with specific emphasis on leadership, power, communication, negotiation, organizational change and self-managed team processes. This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of behavioral theories and provide them with opportunities to apply that learning to inter-personal, group, and organizational problems. This is an experiential course and it is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in business or related areas.Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 and at least Sophomore standing.Fulfills: X in LS Core

Health Sciences

Health Sciences

  • HSC3302C-A Introduction to Public Health
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
Public health aims to understand the occurrence and causes of disease within populations with the goal of prevention and health promotion, through changes in individual behavior, control of infectious disease and environmental health factors, and social and political organization for health improvement. The aim will be to describe the patterns of selected diseases in populations, to explain the causation of disease at the cell/physiological to social levels, to predict disease occurrence and to control disease through prevention strategies aimed at individuals, communities and governments.Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement and X in LS Core.

Liberal Arts

English

  • ENG2770C-A Literature & Film
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
Study of the transformation of works of literature into film, focusing on the different techniques used in cinema, literature, and the relationship of film to traditional literature. Class will focus on four major films and the literature they are based on.Fulfills: AL in LS Core

Philosophy

  • PHL1000C-A Introduction to Philosophy
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA1
A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor.Fulfills: PHL in LS Core
  • PHL2250C-A Philosophy of Happiness
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA2
What is happiness? What makes people happy? Can one person make another person happy? How can anyone judge whether someone is happy? These are perennial questions not only for inquisitive minds but also for thoughtful human beings. Faced with economic, environmental, and ethical challenges, people should wonder whether happiness can be understood mainly and mostly in terms of pleasure, power, and profit. Focusing on the connection between a happy life and a virtuous life, this course explores how happiness can be defined, asks whether it can be measured, and examines the clearly indispensable but often overestimated role that it plays in a flourishing life. Area Requirement for Philosophy: EthicsPrerequisite(s): PHL 1000 or PHL 1100 or PHL 1200 Fulfills: E in LS Core

Religious and Theological Studies

  • RTS1010C-A World Religion
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA2
This course is an introduction to a variety of the world’s religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Indigenous Traditions, Christianity, Islam, and Taoism. We examine origins, beliefs, practices, sacred texts, and historical and cultural aspects. Special attention will be given to Christianity and Catholicism. We will also examine St. Augustine’s life and ideas using various sources.Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.

Women’s and Gender Studies

  • WGS1010C-A Gender & Society
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
  • FA1
This course focuses on gender as a useful category to analyze structures, institutions, relationships, and social problems in the U.S. and globally. Students will learn such key concepts as the social construction of gender, power and privilege, patriarchy, and intersectionality. Topics include gender-based violence, workplace discrimination, and the relationship between sexism, racism, homophobia and other systems of oppression and inequality. The course looks at the intersection of gender, race, ethnicity, and nation with such areas as work, education, media/technology, family, religion, and politics. Students will also social movements that have and continue to emerge to promotegender equality and social justice in the US and globally.Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  • WGS3300C-A US Women’s History
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online
This class will provide an examination of the history of women in America. It will include history prior to colonization, up to the present. The course will explore women’s roles in US Society and the intersection of class, culture, ethnicity and sexuality in shaping women’s historical experiences across time. The course will examine the transformations and continuities in women’s lives as well as the political, social, economic and cultural factors that inspired, infused or inhibited women’s changing roles. This class also explores the ways in which race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity have operated to unite and divide disparate groups of women. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.Fulfills: H and D in LS Core.

Science and Engineering

Math