Registration is now open.

Please note: Courses are subject to change.


Summer I:
May 24 - July 2, 2021
Summer II:
July 12 - August 20, 2021
Summer III:
May 24 - August 20, 2021
Summer VIII - 8 week:
May 24 - July 23, 2021

Summer Session is the Perfect Fit for High School and Pre-College Students

This summer, maintain your learning momentum and strengthen your academic resume by taking a Summer Session course at Merrimack. Earn college credit while exploring a new subject or challenge yourself by taking a tough subject pass/fail. Whatever your interests, you’re sure to find a class that meets your goals and schedule. 

  • Enhance your college application
  • Earn college credit - or study pass/fail
  • Choose from over 30 courses across more than a dozen subjects
  • Learn from experienced faculty
  • All classes are online - study from home, or anywhere!
  • Merrimack’s Academic Success Center provides you with a wide range of opportunities to help enhance your academic performance.

Top Faculty and Staff Picks

While all of Merrimack’s summer classes deliver dynamic learning, these 10 courses have been selected by faculty and staff as our favorite picks for high schoolers: 

Below you’ll find full details on these selected classes, as well as all of our Summer Session classes for upper-grade high school students.

All Summer Courses Available to High School and Pre-College Students

Biology

  • BIO1106C-A Human Biology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
An introduction to the structure and function of human body at the level of cells, tissues organs and organ systems. A special emphasis is placed on the functions of the nervous and endocrine systems and their role in homeostasis and the integration and regulation of the functions of the other tissues and organs. The course will also consider molecular, Mendelian and population genetics. This course is designed primarily for students who intend to major or are majoring in psychology. Prerequisite: none. Not open to BIO/HSC majors. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core.

Communication and Media

  • COM2801C-A Introduction to Communication
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
Having a great idea is not enough; you have to be able to effectively communicate your idea to others. This course will examine principles of interpersonal, organizational, and community-based communication as a means of shaping how individuals respond to advocacy efforts. The critical skills discussed will help you both understand how people are influencing you, and how you can more successfully influence others. This course will prepare you to be a competent communicator in a variety of contexts. Fulfills SOSC in LS core.
  • COM1020C-A Public Communication
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
This course focuses on the concepts and practices associated with effective public communication. A central aspect of this course entails the mastering of public speaking through the process of researching, preparing, and delivering presentations in a variety of formats (e.g., informative, persuasive, and impromptu). The classroom is a laboratory in which to develop the skills needed for effective public communication. In addition, students will also analyze public speaking events as a means of developing a critical understanding of the public communication process. No prerequisite.

Criminology

  • CRM1000C-A Introduction to Criminology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
This course explores crime, justice, and punishment. In this course, the causes of crime and the solutions and policies in place to deter or solve crime will be critically examined. We will also examine the social processes whereby crime is defined and detected, and offenders are apprehended and punished. The overall objective of the course is to examine crime and punishment within the context of the society and culture which surrounds it. These topics are connected to inequalities of race, class, and gender, which will be key concerns throughout this course. Coverage of crime and punishment in the popular media is also a central focus of this course. Required for majors. Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.

English

  • ENG1050C-B Intro to College Writing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
Introduction to the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the foundations of academic discourse, with attention to language, purpose, and context. Students will read and analyze texts to prepare them to write for different audiences. Will include library instruction, research, and documentation. Fulfills first year writing requirement in LS Core. Does not count toward English major or minor.
  • ENG1050C-C Intro to College Writing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
Introduction to the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the foundations of academic discourse, with attention to language, purpose, and context. Students will read and analyze texts to prepare them to write for different audiences. Will include library instruction, research, and documentation. Fulfills first year writing requirement in LS Core. Does not count toward English major or minor.
  • ENG2150C-A Introduction to Creative Writing
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
Introduces the main genres of creative writing, including poetry, memoir, and fiction. In addition to producing their own creative forms such as poems, song lyrics, literary memoir, and short stories, students will study the works of contemporary and canonical authors in each genre. Classwork includes the workshopping of both short and longer projects and will culminate in a portfolio of revised work. Fulfills an AL requirement in LS Core.
  • ENG2050C-A Introduction to Literary Studies
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
This course introduces students to such traditional literary genres as fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as newer and emerging forms such as the graphic novel, creative non-fiction, digital storytelling, and film. Emphasis is given to teaching students to read closely and to write analytically. The course also familiarizes students with a variety of interpretive strategies. Students leave the course recognizing the value of close reading and self-conscious interpretation. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core.

Health Sciences

  • HSC1123C-B Anatomy and Physiology II
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: On-Campus
  • Days/Week: T/W/TH - 9am-1:30pm
  • Summer Session 2
This course continues the human anatomy and physiology topics and includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide an opportunity for the student to further develop and apply the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body. Prerequisite: HSC1122.
  • HSC2300C-B Intro to Nutritional Sciences
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
Nutrition, Diet and Health will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course. Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a STEM requirement in LS Core.

History

  • HIS1119C-B European Exper: Antiquity to Ref
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
The European Experience: Antiquity to the Reformation This course examines the major events and developments in European history from ancient civilizations through the Renaissance and Reformation, with particular emphasis upon the political context, the causes and implications of social and economic change, and cultural evolution. This course is not open to students who have received credit for World Civilization I. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H in LS Core.
  • HIS1106C-B U.S. History I
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
U.S. History I: From Pre-Contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H in LS Core.
  • HIS1106C-A U.S. History I - SECTION FULL
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
U.S. History I: From Pre-Contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills H in LS Core.

Psychology

  • PSY1000C-B Introduction to Psychology
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
Provides a general overview of the wide-ranging field of psychology. Students will explore major concepts and issues in the study of human thinking, feeling, and acting. These include biological foundations of behavior and experience, how people learn and develop, how individuals perceive the world, individual differences in behavior, social influence and social relations, the difference between normative and non-normative behavior, and approaches to therapy. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS core.

Visual and Performing Arts

  • FAA1320C-B History of Rock and Roll
  • 4 Credit(s)
  • Format: Online - Asynchronous
  • Summer Session 2
This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and X in LS Core.