Notable & Quotable

  • Associate professor of civil engineering James Kaklamanos has been named the inaugural recipient of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers Section’s College Educator Award. The award recognizes active members of the college and university academic community in New England who inspire and encourage civil engineering students through their exceptional teaching and mentorship. Additionally, professor emeritus David “Doc” Westerling has been named recipient of the Horne/Gaynor Award, recognizing a BSCES member or registered professional engineer for unpaid public service in a municipal, state or federally elected or appointed post for philanthropic activities in the public interest. The awards were presented at the 170th BSCES Annual Awards Dinner at the Royal Sonesta Boston July 16, 2019. The BSCES is a local section of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

  • Susan B. Marine, associate professor of higher education, had her op-ed “Stonewall’s Children - and Grandchildren - are Alright” in The Nation’s 50th-anniversary commemoration of the Stonewall Riots. She advances the idea that contrary to stereotypes about Millennials, young LGBTQ student activists are working for change in powerful ways on college campuses.

  • Simona Sharoni, professor of women’s and gender studies and director of the Interdisciplinary Institute recently received the Eminent Scholar Award from the feminist theory and gender studies section of the International Studies Association (ISA). Sharoni has been an active member of ISA, one of the largest international academic associations, since 1991.

  • Peter Ellard, the dean of student success and academic support, who also teaches environmental ethics and religious studies, had his article “Don’t Think Your Campus Needs to Prepare for Climate Change? Here’s why you’re wrong” published in The Chronicle of Higher Education. He argues that colleges and universities must adjust to weather changes caused by climate change.

  • Jim Kaklamanos, associate professor of civil engineering and Zampell Family Faculty Fellow, was recently recognized with the Distinguished Service Award from the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Tufts University, where he earned his Ph.D., M.S. and B.S.C.E. The Distinguished Service Award is presented to an alumnus or member of the Tufts CEE community who exemplifies service to their profession and the department.

  • Philosophy professor William Wians has published a second volume of essays titled “Logoi and Muthoi,” exploring interdisciplinary connections between ancient Greek philosophy and literature.  The chapters examine philosophical problems of knowledge and ethics in ancient writers, including Homer, Hesiod, Sophocles, Euripides, the pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, and Lucretius. It is available on Amazon.com

  • Brittnie Aiello and Emma Duffy-Comparone have published “I Never Thought I Could Accomplish Something Like This: The Success and Struggle of Teaching College Courses in Jail” in the Journal of Prison Education and Reentry. The article discusses their work teaching Merrimack College courses at the Essex County Correctional Facility.

  • Fathers Stephen Curry and Richard Piatt spoke to the Eagle-Tribune about the burning of Cathedral of Notre Dame at the start of Holy Week. “She symbolized Paris, a symbol of grace, and hope, and comfort that both humbled and lifted up all those who approached her facade,” said Piatt. Curry said the cathedral “embodies centuries of devout Catholics’ faith, prayers, miracles, religious history, and spiritual inspiration.”

  • Education Department assistant professor Rena Stroud, the senior researcher for Project LEAP at Merrimack, was recently quoted in “Education Week Spotlight” for a story on the benefits of introducing to students as young as elementary school ages. The intent isn’t to introduce curriculum meant for older students, but rather to look at how younger students can think through algebraic concepts.

  • Michael DeCesare, professor of sociology, spoke to the Arizona Republic about a plan to seat a student on the governing board of Maricopa Community College District. DeCesare, chair of the AAUP Committee on College and University Governance, which has raised concerns about board politics, said, “The board has taken some promising first steps, but (the committee) will continue to monitor the situation to ensure the faculty’s governance rights are fully restored at Maricopa.”